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Public Document No. 48 



5% (Entmnamimtltlj of iHaaaarlfUBrttB 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan District Commission 



1924 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration 

and Finance 
1M 4-7-2.5 Order No. 1472. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofm1924mass 




> 

— 
X 



A 



CONTENTS 

I. Organization and Administration . 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
II. General Financial Statement 

III. Construction 

IV. Charles River Bridges 

V. Rainfall and Consumption of Water . 

VI. Special Investigations . . . . 

VII. Other reports 

Report of the Director of Parks' .... 

Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Park Engineering 

Parkways . 

Reservations 

Bridges and Locks 

General 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

Construction 

Pumping Equipment, Southern High Service . 

Arlington Reservoir 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service . 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains .... 

Maintenance 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

Storage Reservoirs 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 . . . . 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton 

Whitehall Reservoirs 
Farm Pond . 
Lake Cochituate . 
Aqueducts 

Wachusett Aqueduct 
Sudbury Aqueduct 
Weston Aqueduct 
Cochituate Aqueduct 
Protection of Water Supply . 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works 

Forestry 

Hydro-electric Service 

Wachusett Service 

Sudbury Service 

Distribution Pumping Stations 

Distribution Reservoirs 

Distribution Buildings and Grounds .... 

Distribution Pipe Lines 

Consumption of Water . . . . . . 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes . 
Water supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District 

Filtration of Water 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations 

Metropolitan Sewers 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 

Construction 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
New Mystic Sewer 



PAGE 

1 



and 



11 



P. D. 48 



e to 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division — Concluded. 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer, Arlington 

Maintenance 

Scope of Work and Force employed 
Deer Island Pumping Station 
East Boston Pumping Station 
.Charlestown Pumping Station 
Winchester Stock Yard 
Ward Street Pumping Station 
Nut Island Screen-house . 
Gasolene in Public Sewers 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewa 
Metropolitan Sewerage System 
North Metropolitan System . 
South Metropolitan System . 
Whole Metropolitan System 
Pumping Stations 

Capacities and Results . 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 
Material intercepted at the Screens 
Financial Statement, Parks Division 

Loan Funds 

Maintenance Expenditures 
Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund . 
Financial Statement, Water and Sewer Divisions 
Water Works — Construction . 

(1) Water Loans, Receipts and Payments 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1924 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 

(4) Water Assessment, 1924 .... 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside 
Water Companies 

Expenditures for the Different Works . 
Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolit 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 

(b) Receipts 

(c) Assets 

(d) Liabilities 

Sewerage Works 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1924 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking 

31, 1924 

Sewer Assessments, 1924 
Expenditures for the Different Works . 
Detailed Financial Statement 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 

Receipts 

Assets 

Liabilities 

— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made 
and pending during the Year 1924 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan 
Water Works 



PAGE 



(6) 

(?) 



(2) 



(3) 

(4) 
(5) 
(6) 



(b) 

(c) 

(d) 

Appendix No. 1. 

Appendix No. 2. 



an Water 



31, 1924 



of District and to 



.\ct 



Funds, December 



P. D. 48. 

Appendix No. 2 — 
Table No. 1. 

Table No. 2. 
Table No. 3. 

Table No. 4. 

Table No. 5. 

Table No. 6. 

Table No. 7. 
Table No. 8. 

Table No. 9. 

Table No, 10. 

Table No. 11. 

Table No. 12. 

Table No. 13. 
Table No. 14. 

Table No. 15. 

Table No. 16. 

Table No. 17. 
Table No. 18. 
Table No. 19. 

Table No. 20. 
Table No. 21. 

Table No. 22 

Table No. 23 

Appendix No. 3. - 
Appendix No. 4. - 



in 

Concluded. PAGE 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1924 .... 69 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1924 . 70 

— Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1924 . ... 71 

— Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage 

and Rainfall in 1924 72 

— Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1924 73 

— Sources from which and Periods during Which Water 

has been drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan 
Water District 74 

— Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1924 by Months 75 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by 

Districts in Cities and Towns supplied by the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1924 76 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in 

Cities and Towns supplied by Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1924 ... 77 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett 

Reservoir, Clinton 80 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury 

Reservoir 81 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, 

Stoneham 81 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate 82 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the 

State House, Boston 82 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 

Boston, 1898-1924 . _ 83 

— Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water 

from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 
1898-1924 83 

— Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1924 .84 

— Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Met- 

ropolitan Water Works in 1924 85 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Number of Valves set in Same, 
December 31, 1924 . . ... .86 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, Blow- 

off and Drain Pipes, December 31, 1924 ... 86 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Water Pipes Four Inches in Diameter 
and Larger in the Several Cities and Towns supplied 
by the Metropolitan Water Works, December 31, 1924 87 

— Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services 

metered, Fire Services, and Fire Hydrants in the Sev- 
eral Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan 
Waterworks, December 31, 1924 88 

— Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above 

Boston City Base for each Month at Stations on the 
Metropolitan Water Works during 1924 ... 89 

- Contracts made and pending during the year 1924 — 

Sewerage Division , 92 

- Financial Statement presented to the General Court on 

January 15, 1925 94 



CONTENTS 

I. Organization and Administration . 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
II. General Financial Statement 

III. Construction . . . 

IV. Charles River Bridges ...... 

V. Rainfall and Consumption of Water . 

VI. Special Investigations 

VII. Other reports 

Report of the Director of Parks .... 

Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Park Engineering 

Parkways 

Reservations 

Bridges and Locks 

General 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

Construction . 

Pumping Equipment, Southern High Service . 

Arlington Reservoir 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service . 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains .... 

Maintenance 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

Storage Reservoirs 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 . 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton 

Whitehall Reservoirs 
Farm Pond . 
Lake Cochituate . 
Aqueducts 

Wachusett Aqueduct 
Sudbury Aqueduct 
Weston Aqueduct 
Cochituate Aqueduct 
Protection of Water Supply .... 
Clinton Sewage Disposal Works ..... 

Forestry 

Hydro-electric Service 

Wachusett Service 

Sudbury Service 

Distribution Pumping Stations 

Distribution Reservoirs 

Distribution Buildings and Grounds .... 

Distribution Pipe Lines 

Consumption of Water . 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes . 
Water supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District 

Filtration of Water 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations 

Metropolitan Sewers 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 

Construction 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
New Mystic Sewer 



PAGE 

1 



and 



11 



P. D. 48 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division — Concluded 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer, Arlington 

Maintenance 

Scope of Work and Force employed 
Deer Island Pumping Station 
East Boston Pumping Station 
Charlestown Pumping Station 
Winchester Stock Yard 
Ward Street Pumping Station 
Nut Island Screen-house . 
Gasolene in Public Sewers 
Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to 
Metropolitan Sewerage System 
North Metropolitan System . 
South Metropolitan System . 
Whole Metropolitan System 
Pumping Stations 

Capacities and Results . 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 
Material intercepted at the Screens 
Financial Statement, Parks Division 

Loan Funds 

Maintenance Expenditures 
Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund . 
Financial Statement, Water and Sewer Divisions 
Water Works — Construction . 

(1) Water Loans, Receipts and Payments 
Total Water Debt, December 31, 1924 
Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 
Water Assessment, 1924 
Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside 

Water Companies 

Expenditures for the Different Works . 

Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 

(b) Receipts 

(c) Assets 

(d) Liabilities 

Sewerage Works 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1924 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking 

31, 1924 

Sewer Assessments, 1924 
Expenditures for the Different Works . 
Detailed Financial Statement 

Expenditures and Disbursements 

Receipts . . 

Assets . . . 

Liabilities 

— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made 
and pending during the Year 1924 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan 
Water Works 



PAGE 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

(6) 

(7) 



(2) 



(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
Appendix No. 1. 

Appendix No. 2. 



31, 1924 



of District and to 



Funds, December 



64 



69 



P. D. 48. 

Appendix No. 2 — 
Table No. 1. 

Table No. 2. 
Table No. 3. 

Table No. 4. 

Table No. 5. 

Table No. 6. 

Table No. 7. 
Table No. 8. 

Table No. 9. 

Table No. 10.- 

Table No. 11. 

Table No. 12. 

Table No. 13. 
Table No. 14. 

Table No. 15. 

Table No. 16. 

Table No. 17. 
Table No. 18. 
Table No. 19. 

Table No. 20. 
Table No. 21. 

Table No. 22. 

Table No. 23. 

Appendix No. 3. — 
Appendix No. 4. — 



in 

Concluded. PAGE 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1924 . . .69 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1924 . 70 

— Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1924 . . ... 71 

— Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage 

and Rainfall in 1924 72 

— Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1924 73 

— Sources from which and Periods during Which Water 

has been drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan 
Water District . 74 

— Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1924 by Months 75 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by 

Districts in Cities and Towns supplied by the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1924 76 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in 

Cities and Towns supplied by Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1924 77 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett 

Reservoir, Clinton 80 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury 

Reservoir 81 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, 

Stoneham . .81 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate 82 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the 

State House, Boston 82 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 

Boston, 1898-1924 . 83 

— Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water 

from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 
1898-1924 83 

— Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1924 .84 

— Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Met- 

ropolitan Water Works in 1924 85 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Number of Valves set in Same, 
December 31, 1924 . ... .86 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, Blow- 

off and Drain Pipes, December 31, 1924 ... 86 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Water Pipes Four Inches in Diameter 
and Larger in the Several Cities and Towns supplied 
by the Metropolitan Water Works, December 31, 1924 87 

— Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services 

metered, Fire Services, and Fire Hydrants in the Sev- 
eral Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan 
Waterworks, December 31, 1924 88 

— Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above 

Boston City Base for each Month at Stations on the 
Metropolitan Water Works during 1924 ... 89 

— Contracts made and pending during the year 1924 — 

Sewerage Division 92 

— Financial Statement presented to the General Court on 

January 15, 1925 94 



II. 
III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 



CONTENTS 

Organization and Administration . 

Commission, Officers and Employees 
General Financial Statement 

Construction 

Charles River Bridges 

Rainfall and Consumption of Water . 
Special Investigations . . . . ■ . 

Other reports 

Report of the Director of Parks .... 

Report of the Director and Chief Engineer of Park Engineering 

Parkways 

Reservations 

Bridges and Locks 

General 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Water Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Water District and Works 

Construction 

Pumping Equipment, Southern High Service . 

Arlington Reservoir 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service . 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains .... 

Maintenance 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

Storage Reservoirs 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 . 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton 

Whitehall Reservoirs 
Farm Pond . 
Lake Cochituate . 
Aqueducts 

Wachusett Aqueduct 
Sudbury Aqueduct 
Weston Aqueduct 
Cochituate Aqueduct 
Protection of Water Supply . 
Clinton Sewage Disposal Works . . 

Forestry 

Hydro-electric Service . . 

Wachusett Service . 

Sudbury Service 

Distribution Pumping Stations 

Distribution Reservoirs 

Distribution Buildings and Grounds .... 

Distribution Pipe Lines 

Consumption of Water 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes . 
Water supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District 

Filtration of Water 

Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division 

Organization 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

Areas and Populations 

Metropolitan Sewers . . . . 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections 

Construction 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 
New Mystic Sewer 



PAGE 

1 



and 



11 



P. D. 48 



e to 



Report of Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division — Concluded. 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer, Arlington 

Maintenance 

Scope of Work and Force employed 
Deer Island Pumping Station 
East Boston Pumping Station 
Charlestown Pumping Station 
Winchester Stock Yard 
Ward Street Pumping Station 
Nut Island Screen-house . 
Gasolene in Public Sewers . 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewa 
Metropolitan Sewerage System 
North Metropolitan System . 
South Metropolitan System . 
Whole Metropolitan System 
Pumping Stations 

Capacities and Results . 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 
Material intercepted at the Screens 
Financial Statement, Parks Division 
Loan Funds . . . . 
Maintenance Expenditures 
Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund . 
Financial Statement, Water and Sewer Divisions 
Water Works — Construction . 

(1) Water Loans, Receipts and Payments 
Total Water Debt, December 31, 1924 
Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 
Water Assessment, 1924 .... 

Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside 

Water Companies 

Expenditures for the Different Works . 

Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 

(b) Receipts 

(c) Assets 

(d) Liabilities 

Sewerage Works 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1924 
North Metropolitan System 
South Metropolitan System 
North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking 

31, 1924 

Sewer Assessments, 1924 
Expenditures for the Different Works . 
Detailed Financial Statement 

Expenditures and Disbursements 

Receipts 

Assets 

Liabilities . . 

— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made 
and pending during the Year 1924 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan 
Water Works 



PAGE 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

(6) 

(7) 



(2) 



(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(a) 
(b) 
ifi) 
id) 
Appendix No. 1. 

Appendix No. 2. 



31, 1924 



of District and to 



Act 



Funds, December 



64 



69 



P. D. 48. 

Appendix No. 2 — 
Table No. 1. 

Table No. 2. 
Table No. 3. 

Table No. 4. 

Table No. 5. 

Table No. 6. 

Table No. 7. 
Table No. 8. 

Table No. 9. 

Table No. 10. 

Table No. 11. 

Table No. 12. 

Table No. 13. 
Table No. 14. 

Table No. 15. 

Table No. 16. 

Table No. 17. 
Table No. 18. 
Table No. 19. 

Table No. 20. 
Table No. 21. 

Table No. 22 

Table No. 23 

Appendix No. 3. - 
Appendix No. 4. - 



m 

Concluded. PAGE 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the 

Metropolitan Water Works in 1924 . . . .69 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1924 . 70 

— W T achusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1924 . ... 71 

— Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of W T ater, Storage 

and Rainfall in 1924 ^ .72 

— Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, 

Storage and Rainfall in 1924 73 

— Sources from which and Periods during Which Water 

has been drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan 
Water District . 74 

— Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through 

Aqueducts in 1924 by Months 75 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by 

Districts in Cities and Towns supplied by the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 1924 76 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in 

Cities and Towns supplied by Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1924 . . 77 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett 

Reservoir, Clinton 80 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury 

Reservoir 81 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, 

Stoneham 81 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate 82 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the 

State House, Boston 82 

— Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 

Boston, 1898-1924 . 83 

— Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water 

from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 
1898-1924 83 

— Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1924 .84 

— Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Met- 

ropolitan Water Works in 1924 85 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Number of Valves set in Same, 
December 31, 1924 . . ... .86 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Hydrant, Blow- 

off and Drain Pipes, December 31, 1924 ... 86 

— Length of Metropolitan Water Works Main Lines and 

Connections and Water Pipes Four Inches in Diameter 
and Larger in the Several Cities and Towns supplied 
by the Metropolitan Water Works, December 31, 1924 87 

— Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services 

metered, Fire Services, and Fire Hydrants in the Sev- 
eral Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan 
Waterworks, December 31, 1924 88 

— Elevation of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above 

Boston City Base for each Month at Stations on the 
Metropolitan Water Works during 1924 ... 89 

- Contracts made and pending during the year 1924 — 

Sewerage Division 92 

- Financial Statement presented to the General Court on 

January 15, 1925 94 



REPORT OF THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner has already presented to your Hon- 
orable Body an abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, disburse- 
ments and liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission for the fiscal year 
ending on November 30, 1924, and now, in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 100 of Chapter 92 of the General Laws, presents a detailed statement of 
its doings for the calendar year ending on December 31, 1924. 

FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 
I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Commission, Officers and Employees 

James A. Bailey, sometime previous to the expiration of his term of office on 
November 30, 1924, presented his resignation which, however, was not accepted 
until after that date. He had with marked ability and with studious care for the 
interests of the Metropolitan District served for twenty years on various boards 
and commissions: as chairman of the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sioners, April 1, 1900 to March 20, 1901, member of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board, March 20, 1901 to March 20, 1913, member of the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board, March 20, 1918 to December 1, 1919, and after the 
consolidation in 1919 as Commissioner of the Metropolitan District Commission. 
Davis B. Keniston was appointed to fill the vacancy. The membership of the 
Commission, with this exception, remains the same as in the preceding year: 
Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner; Frank A. Bayrd, Frank G. Hall, William H. 
Squire and George B. Wason, Associate Commissioners. Frank G. Hall is Director 
of Parks, John R. Rablin, Director of Park Engineering, William E. Foss, Director 
of the Water Division and Frederick D. Smith, Director of the Sewerage Division. 

George Lyman Rogers has continued as secretary and the following as chief 
engineers: of parks, John R. Rablin; of water, William E. Foss; of sewerage, 
Frederick D. Smith. 

The maximum number of employees during the year was 1,590, divided as 
follows: general offices, 25; parks, 952; water, 383; sewerage, 230. 

In this tabulation of employees the police are included under parks, although 
they give considerable protection to portions of the water system. 



II. GENERAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Year ending November 30, 1924 

Expenditure for construction $2,286,000 56 

Expenditure for maintenance ........ 2,723,550 31 

Total expenditure 5,009,550 87 

Unexpended balance maintenance appropriations .... 221,907 68 

Serial bonds issued 1,000,000 00 

Serial bonds paid 218,243 75 

Increase in sinking funds 2,134,839 95 

Decrease in net debt 1,353,083 70 

On November 30, 1924 
Net debt $42,142,854 94 

III. CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE 

The New Mystic Sewer in Winchester and Woburn was completed in August 
and an opening provided for the projected sewer in the Aberjona River Valley 
in Woburn. 

Work on the first section of the Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Arlington and 
Medford was begun in July and about 1,500 feet have already been constructed. 
Plans and specifications for another section are nearly completed and work will be 
commenced early in the season. 



2 P. D. 48 

Extended repairs have been made at the Deer Island, East Boston and Charles- 
town pumping stations and a new locker building has been constructed at the 
Winchester stock yard. 

The new centrifugal pump and uniflow engine for the Ward Street Pumping 
Station has been put in place and the connections necessary for use are about 
completed. 

The roof of the Nut Island Screen-house has been repaired and the yard at 
Prospect Street fenced. 

Incidental additions of an air chamber, smoke flue, soot blower, feed pipes 
and blow-off drains and insulation coverings at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 
No. 1 were completed April 1. 

The masonry tower for the Arlington Reservoir has been completed and the 
grounds surrounding the reservoir graded and seeded. 

The new engine at the Spot Pond Pumping Station has been installed and the 
connections are nearly completed. 

Of the new Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains the connection from the terminal 
chamber at Weston to Charles River has been completed and of the main from 
Weston to Medford, one section 11,365 feet in length has been completed. About 
9,000 feet of two other sections have been laid, leaving 20,000 feet partially con- 
structed, and upon the last section, 7,000 feet in length, the preliminary work is 
finished. The entire main will be laid and connections made during the coming 
year. 

In the Blue Hills Parkway 7,192 square feet of concrete sidewalk have been 
built. 

The connecting link of Furnace Brook Parkway between Newport Avenue and 
Hancock Street, across the location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, together with the new overpass railroad bridge, has been constructed 
and the parkway surfaced. 

Plans and specifications have been prepared for building a half-tide dam in 
Black's Creek for bathing purposes and work will commence upon the contribu- 
tion by the city of Quincy of its share of the cost. 

In the Middlesex Fells the drainage system has been extended between Mystic 
Avenue and Somerville Avenue, and 1,709 square feet of granolithic sidewalks 
have been laid. 

Two additional shelters have been built opposite the bath house at Nahant 
Beach and playground apparatus installed in the area at the rear. 

The section of the Neponset River Parkway from West River Street near the 
exit from Stony Brook Reservation to Regent Street, Hyde Park, has been 
constructed. 

Plans and surveys for the Northern Traffic Artery are nearly completed. 

Neponset Bridge is substantially completed, the Old Colony Parkway from 
Quincy Shore Reservation to Freeport Street, Dorchester, constructed and con- 
siderable filling done in the section between Columbia Road and Fox Point. 

West Border Road in the West Roxbury Parkway has been built from the 
pleasure drive to LaGrange Street. 

Toilet facilities at the Riverside Recreation Grounds have been provided by 
remodeling and refitting a portion of one of the boat houses. 

A section of the Lynn Shore sea wall, damaged by the storms of last winter, 
has been repaired. 

Concrete walks, steps, curbs and a fence have been built in connection with 
the shelter building at the corner of Nantasket Avenue and the steamboat land- 
ing, and the interior refitted for use as a refectory. 

The reservation drive from Eliot Circle to Revere Street, Revere, has been 
reconstructed, with bituminous concrete surfacing and concrete curb. Further 
reconstruction will be resumed in the spring. 

The work of replacing gas lighting by electric lighting on the parkways has 
been started with a section from Eliot Circle to Northern Circle, Revere. 

Repairs have been made upon bridges and locks and further important repairs 
will be necessary during the coming year. 



P. D. 48 3 

IV. CHARLES RIVER BRIDGES 

The new reinforced arch bridge with its approaches over the Charles River 
Basin at Western Avenue is virtually completed and was opened to traffic Decem- 
ber 27, 1924. The bridge as constructed is a handsome and appropriate struc- 
ture, a tribute to the judgment of the jury of architects who selected the design. 

Plans and specifications for a new bridge over the Charles River Basin at 
Arsenal Street have been completed, the contract awarded, and work will com- 
mence in the spring. The bridge, consisting of two reinforced concrete arch 
spans, will be 222 feet in length and 60 feet wide. 

As a result of the recommendations of the Metropolitan Planning Division the 
Legislature passed Chapter 416 of 1924, combining in one structure the highway 
and railroad bridges at Cottage Farm. Consequently new plans have been pre- 
pared and submitted to the Boston & Albany Railroad, whose assent under 
the act is required. It has involved considerable study both on the part of the 
Commission and the Railroad, but it is expected that the problem is about solved 
and that the detail work of design and construction will progress rapidly during 
the coming year. 

Harvard Bridge, under authority of an act passed in 1924, has been strengthened 
and repaired, new flooring laid and resurfaced, the movable draw fixed and wid- 
ened, and a new street lighting system is being installed. The work is substan- 
tially completed and the bridge has been opened to traffic. The bridge at a 
relatively small cost has been rendered safe and adequate for traffic for many 
years. 

V. RAINFALL AND CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

The rainfall on all the watersheds was above normal in April and September 
and noticeably below normal during the latter part of the year. The Wachusett 
Reservoir filled by April 7 and continued full until May 31. During the re- 
mainder of the year it was drawn down steadily until on December 31 it was 
15.02 feet below high-water mark. Although this is an unusually low level for 
this season of the year it is not excessive considering the low rainfall and the 
difficulties encountered by the water systems of many other cities and towns. 
There is no occasion for alarm lest there be an insufficient supply of water for 
the Metropolitan Water District even though the reservoir should not entirely 
fill during the coming spring. The available water in storage in the Wachusett 
Reservoir is sufficient for the requirements of the District, including water fur- 
nished the city of Worcester and towns of Brookline, Clinton and Framingham, 
for two consecutive years as dry as the driest years on record during the past 
fifty years. 

During the year the city of Newton drew 98,762,000 gallons of water to supple- 
ment its own supply. 

Under an extension of authority granted by the Commission on October 18, 
1923, the city of Worcester operated its pumping station on the upper part of 
the Wachusett Reservoir, and from November 10 to the close of the year drew 
240,000,000 gallons of water into its mains. Due to the continued low yield of 
its watersheds the city is now preparing additional pumping facilities to increase 
its capacity. 

During the year 45,420,493,000 gallons of water were furnished to the 18 cities 
and towns supplied, equivalent to a daily consumption of 124,099,700 gallons, and 
for the estimated population of 1,300,000 at the rate of 95 gallons per capita per 
day, a decrease of 2 gallons per capita since 1923. 

VI. SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 25 of the Resolves of 1924 the 
Commission investigated and reported as to the feasibility, desirability and prob- 
able cost of constructing, operating and maintaining public bath houses on reser- 
vations or parkways under its control which border on rivers or ponds. The 
report is printed as House Document 420 of 1925. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 39 of the Resolves of 1924 the 
Commission investigated and reported upon the construction and cost of proposed 
routes through the Lynn Woods. The report is printed as House Document 
211 of 1925. 



4 P. D. 48 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 52 of the Resolves of 1924 the 
Commission considered the subject matter of House Document 606 of 1924 rela- 
tive to the reconstruction of the main highway over the Nantasket Beach Reser- 
vation in the town of Hull and of the sidewalks along the same, and particularly 
as to the allocation of the cost thereof upon the town of Hull and of sidewalk 
betterments upon the abutters. The report is printed as House Document 113 
of 1925. 

VII. OTHER REPORTS 

The reports of the Directors of Parks, Park Engineering, Water and Sewerage, 
with tables, statistics and financial statements, are herewith preseuted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVIS B. KENISTON, 

Metropolitan District Commissioner. 
February 26, 1925. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PARKS 

Hon. Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

My Dear Sir: — I submit herewith a brief report of the changes in, and work 
being done by, the Parks Division of the Metropolitan District Commission. 

Hon. James A. Bailey, who was appointed Commissioner when this Commission 
was organized, resigned on December 10, 1924. He was most untiring in his 
efforts to help in the management of its many problems, and under his able leader- 
ship much new work was successfully accomplished and many new plans for 
future development perfected. 

Other important changes in the personnel of the Parks Division the past year 
have been as follows: — 

Herbert W. West, Superintendent of Revere Beach Division and of the Metro- 
politan District Police, died on May 29, 1924. Mr. West was born in Cambridge 
on March 16, 1859. He began service for the Commonwealth in 1896, as a police 
officer at Revere Beach Reservation under the Metropolitan Park Commission, 
and in the same year was made Superintendent of the Reservation, in charge of 
the maintenance work and policing. In 1909, Mr. West was appointed a Captain 
of Police and placed in charge of Revere Beach Division, embracing Revere 
Beach, King's Beach, Lynn Shore and Winthrop Shore Reservations, and Revere 
Beach, Nahant Beach and Winthrop Parkways and Lynn way, to which were 
added, in 1911, Charles River Division, Lower Basin, including the Charles River 
Basin to North Harvard Street, and later Bunker Hill Monument. Chapter 406 
of the Acts of the year 1922, authorized the Metropolitan District Commission 
to appoint Mr. West Superintendent of the entire Metropolitan District Com- 
mission police force, and his appointment by the Commission was made on June 
12, 1922. He was serving in that capacity, as well as that of Superintendent of 
Revere Beach and Charles River Lower Basin Divisions, at the time of his death. 
Mr. West began his service in the formative period of Revere Beach Reservation 
and practically of the Metropolitan Park System. He saw under his immediate 
supervision the development of Revere Beach, in particular, from the raw condi- 
tion which characterized it before public ownership to its present state, a beautiful 
shore reservation thronged with multitudes of people in the season. The task of 
putting into effect the policy which led to this development fell mostly on 
Mr. West, and his sound judgment and tact were large factors in shaping this policy 
and in making the reservation and the bath house what they are. Mr. West was 
a close friend and great admirer of the late Hon. Edwin U. Curtis, Police Com- 
missioner of Boston, and during the police strike was in almost daily conference 
with Mr. Curtis and rendered him invaluable service, both personally and through 
the Metropolitan Park Police. Mr. West was a man of strict honor and integ- 
rity, and a stern but kindly and sympathetic disciplinarian. He was tactful and 
courteous in his dealings with the public, always being guided by the view, fre- 
quently expressed by him, that each member of the public was a partner in the 
public property under his supervision. His loss is severely felt in the adminis- 
tration of the Park System and by the Commission and his host of friends in public 
and private life. After his death Captain Spencer G. Hawkins was appointed in 



P. D. 48 5 

his place as Superintendent of Maintenance of the Revere Beach Division. The 
position as Superintendent held by Captain Hawkins in Middlesex Fells Division 
has been filled by the promotion of Lieutenant Edward M. W. Brawley to the 
rank of Captain. Captain Chapman was appointed Superintendent of Charles 
River Division, Lower Basin. 

Another important change was the retirement of Captain John L. Gilman on 
July 31, 1924, on account of ill health. Mr. Gilman began his service with the 
Metropolitan Park Commission on July 23, 1897, in the Revere Beach Bath House, 
under Superintendent West. On August 18, 1899, he was appointed Superin- 
tendent and Chief of Police at the Speedway. During the summer of the next 
year he was assigned to special duty as Superintendent and Chief of Police at 
Nantasket Beach Reservation. On April 1, 1908, Superintendent Gilman was 
also made Superintendent of the Riverside Section of Charles River Reservation, 
and in 1916 Beaver Brook Reservation was placed in his charge. In 1909, 
Mr. Gilman was made a Captain of Police. The trotting track of the Speedway was 
under the management of Mr. Gilman from the time it was constructed until the 
time of his retirement, and the satisfaction which this track has given to the 
owners of trotting horses and to the public who are fond of horses and sports of 
the track is due almost entirely to Superintendent Gilman. In his retirement the 
Commission has lost a skilled and faithful employee, and the best wishes of the 
Commission and of hosts of friends among the general public that he may enjoy 
many years of well-earned rest follow him into private life. Superintendent 
Gilman's position has been filled by the transfer of Lieutenant Frederick W. Garrett 
from Blue Hills Division to Charles River Upper Division, and his promotion to 
the rank of Captain. 

On May 6, 1924, dedicatory exercises were held of the memorial erected on the 
Boston Embankment to Hon. Edwin U. Curtis, former Police Commissioner of 
Boston, and for so many years a member of the Metropolitan Park Commission. 
The Boston Embankment and the Charles River Basin were placed by law under 
the control of this Commission in 1910. From that time on the walk along the 
Basin was a favorite one with Mr. Curtis on his way to and from his office in town. 
As a member of the Metropolitan Park Commission, he took a personal interest 
and pride in the upkeep of the embankment, and it was peculiarly fitting that a 
spot on the embankment should be chosen as a site for this memorial. The fund 
for it was created by voluntary contributions from the hosts of Mr. Curtis' friends 
of every degree among the general public. A special committee of his friends and 
admirers received and administered this fund and contracted for and supervised 
the erection of the memorial. Although the memorial is unostentatious as was 
the man whom it commemorates, it is nevertheless a most attractive and graceful 
work of art. 

The Harvard Bridge, which we have repaired and put in serviceable condition, 
is another addition to our system, and seems at present to be a most successful 
improvement. The Neponset Bridge is completed and is a great help to traffic 
conditions in this locality. Old Colony Parkway, from the bridge to Freeport 
Street, has been finished with the exception of a short distance near the railroad. 
At Freeport Street will begin the southerly approach of the proposed bridge across 
Dorchester Bay. Opposition now seems withdrawn to the building of the bridge 
at this location. The competition of architects on Western Avenue Bridge, just 
completed, and on Cottage Farm and other bridges which we are about to build 
at Arsenal Street and River Street over the Charles River, has been well worth 
while, and the same policy should be continued in preparation of plans for the 
bridge over Dorchester Bay. Much filling has been done on the Old Colony 
Parkway and we should be able to ask for bids to complete this work in the near 
future. 

By Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1924, the Commission was authorized to lay out 
and construct the "Northern Artery," so-called, through Somerville and Cam- 
bridge, at a cost of $2,400,000. The preliminary work is now under way. Plans 
are being drawn, takings are about to be made and work of construction should 
be started in the near future. It is hoped that we shall be allowed to use a space 
at least a hundred feet in width along the Charles River for this great lasting 
improvement. 



G 



P. D. 48 



The proposed extension of West Roxbury Parkway to the west from its present 
dead end is much needed, and should be built to Newton Street at once. The 
estimated cost of this extension is $222,000. The Blue Hill River Road has been 
temporarily held up by conditions attached by the towns of Milton and Canton 
to the appropriations made by those towns for the construction of connecting 
roads, and some change of the act authorizing the Commission to build this road 
will be necessary before construction of the road can go on. In co-operation with 
the Appalachian Mountain Club, what is known as a "Sky Line Trail" has been 
built across Blue Hills Reservation. The principal peaks and most interesting 
parts of the Reservation are included, and since the new trails have been laid out, 
they have been used by large numbers of people. It is again recommended that 
Quincy Shore Drive be widened. The traffic here is very heavy and will be still 
greater when the Old Colony Parkway is constructed. 

The usual precautions have been taken during the past year against the gypsy 
moth, and the moths seem now to be well under control. We have sufficient 
arsenate of lead on hand to do all work necessary in the different divisions the 
coming spring. This decrease in cost of labor and material should be quite a 
saving. During the past three years the sum of $262,197.13 has been paid for 
moth work in all divisions. 

The Commission continues its work of planting trees and shrubs in the various 
reservations and along the parkways. A large nursery is maintained near the 
headquarters on Pond Street, Stoneham, and last year 620 trees and 1,153 shrubs 
were set out there. In Blue Hills Division alone, 3,154,607 trees and 20,070 
shrubs have been set out since 1907. In order to give an idea of the large amount 
of planting which is being done from year to year, the following table showing the 
number of trees and shrubs planted in the different divisions during the past five 
years, is given : — 



Blue Hills Division .... 
Middlesex Fells Division . 
Charles River Division, Lower Basin 
Charles River Upper Division . 
Revere Beach Division 
Nantasket Beach Division 



Trees 


Shrubs 


272,375 


4,070 


. . . . 117,085 


1,161 


456 


2,125 


. . . . 555 


4,840 


395 


50 


62 


662 



390,928 



12,908 



For planting in 1925, about 130,834 trees and 800 shrubs can be used by the 
Captains of the divisions. 

The lighting of our parkways has been very poor, but it has now been made 
possible to begin the installation of electric lighting. The first reservation to 
benefit by this change will be the Revere Beach Reservation. Magnetite arc 
lamps of 1,500 candle power are to be installed 100 feet apart from Eliot Circle to 
Revere Street, and 200 feet apart from Revere Street to Northern Circle, at an 
estimated cost for installation of about $50,000. I strongly recommend that 
electric lighting be authorized for all the parkways. 

The work done by our men in clearing the roads of snow after storms is not 
equalled by any city or town in this vicinity. 

The vacant lots at Revere Beach not now required for our use should be leased 
for parking spaces, relieving the congestion on the boulevard and bringing in some 
revenue. 

The Charles River Basin has been well patronized. The motor boats carrying 
passengers for hire around the Basin have been taxed to their carrying capacity. 
All are licensed by the Commission and inspected by the police, so that although 
thousands are taken around the Basin, no accidents have been reported. A new 
police boat has been used in this division some months, and does fine work, making 
twenty miles an hour and greater speed. The other police boats on the Basin, 
three in number, are over fourteen years old and will need renewing in the near 
future. Many have enjoyed the rowing on the river and the number of shells 
is increasing each year The skating has been rather poor because of rough ice 
and snow. 



P. D. 48 7 

The building of the Northern Artery will necessitate the moving of our present 
inadequate stables at the Charles River Basin. These should be remodeled and 
much enlarged. By raising slightly a good-sized garage could be made of the 
present basement without great expense. Many more cars and motorcycles will 
be needed here in the future. 

The duties of traffic officers in Charles River Division, Lower Basin, have been 
greatly increased by taking charge of Harvard Bridge and the temporary bridge 
near Cottage Farm. Both bridges are policed day and night and carry very 
heavy traffic. 

In Charles River Reservation, the Speedway has been well patronized by the 
general public as well as by the horsemen. More bridle paths have been laid out 
in this division. The road on the Boston side should be built through from North 
Harvard Street at Anderson Bridge to Bay State Road. Harvard College is about 
to expend many millions on its land here abutting on the Speedway Section, some 
of which has recently been sold to the College by the Commission. The extension 
of this road should eliminate much of the traffic jam which is a great problem now 
at the bridges. It could be connected with Commonwealth Avenue where it 
turns at Brighton Avenue, and relieve traffic congestion on that avenue. The 
bridge at Cottage Farm is poorly situated because of the grade made necessary 
by the railroad. It should have been located further down the river. A road 
under the proposed bridge will help if extended to Bay State Road. Without 
this the proposed Cottage Farm Bridge will not long take the place of the two 
bridges now in use there. 

The Charles River Reservation and the Riverside Recreation Grounds have 
been well patronized, but the automobile stops the growth of canoe enthusiasm. 
In this division our police made 531 arrests the past year, and 59 rescues from 
drowning were made. 

The three large bath houses at Revere, Nahant and Nantasket were operated 
as usual. At Revere a total number of 165,362 bathers used the bath house, and 
the total receipts for the season were $37,672.15; at Nahant, total number of 
bathers, 46,644, receipts $10,783.65; and at Nantasket, total number of bathers 
86,257, receipts $18,296.95. At Magazine Beach Bath House, on the Charles 
River in Cambridge, which was in existence at the time the Cambridge Park 
lands were conveyed to the Commonwealth and has since been maintained and 
operated by the Commission, there were 22,156 bathers during the season and 
the total receipts were $4,447.55. The Commission also maintains a bath house 
at Hoosicwhisick Pond in Blue Hills Reservation, small bath houses in Charles 
River Reservation off Pine Grove at Newton Lower Falls and off Forest Grove 
Road, Norumbega Park, and two small wooden bath houses at Upper Mystic 
Lake, Winchester. 

One hundred and thirty-three band concerts w r ere given by the Commission 
during the summer of 1924. They were well attended and the sum of $19,152.66 
was expended for this purpose. The sum of $847.34 was turned back into the 
state treasury from the appropriation. 

The maintenance of the different divisions for the fiscal year 1924, has cost as 
follows : — 

Blue Hills Division $243,525 83 

Middlesex Fells Division 335,265 93 

Charles River Division, Lower Basin 247,893 29 

Charles River Upper Division 133,291 41 

Revere Beach Division 253,160 97 

Nantasket Beach Division 75,489 58 

Our police force is the most efficient of its size and handles more people and 
automobiles per man than any in the country. Our men are gentlemen and really 
guardians of the peace who enforce the laws without show of weapons or bravado. 
Their duties have been greatly increased because of the wrongly named "Prohibi- 
tion Amendment" and the increase in motor traffic and additional roads and 
bridges given over to the Commission for maintenance. In spite of these increases 
we have kept our force and expenses down. The total number of arrests during 
the year was 4,313; 157 found not guilty; 866 arrests for drunkenness; 123 



8 P. D. 48 

arrests for operating while under the influence of liquor; 2,759 accidents reported; 
616 injured and sick persons assisted; 67 rescued from drowning; 41 dead bodies 
recovered; value of property recovered, $69,900.41. The amount appropriated 
for the Police Department was $408,600. Of this amount $401,900.04 was 
expended, leaving a balance of $6,699.96. It is noted that the number of criminal 
cases handled by the department the past year is an increase of 23 per cent over 
the number handled the previous year; the fines show an increase of 26 per cent; 
the arrests for drunkenness an increase of 50 per cent; the arrests for operating 
motor vehicles while under the influence of liquor, an increase of 9 per cent. 

The Police Department now consists of 6 captains, 4 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant 
inspector, 16 sergeants, 2 detective sergeants, 136 patrolmen, 1 police woman and 
1 patrolman under Chapter 92, Section 63, of the General Laws. Two patrolmen 
have been retired and one discharged. The old-fashioned long-skirted dress coat, 
used as a part of the police uniform, is to be discarded, and an up-to-date reefer 
will take its place. Authority has been given to allow the officers, when on special 
duty, 75 cents for meals instead of 50 cents, which is the amount formerly allowed. 
The pay of patrolmen was advanced, as recommended 10 per cent, but no increase 
has been allowed by the Commission on Administration and Finance for the 
superior officers. The pay of the officers should be advanced as well as the pay of 
the patrol men; otherwise there is little incentive to do good work and seek 
promotion. 

The 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill occurs in June of this year. 
The historical monument which commemorates the place where that great event 
took place was erected by the Bunker Hill Monument Association, an organiza- 
tion of patriotic citizens incorporated by Chapter 1 of the Acts of the year 1823, 
as amended by Chapter 122 of the Acts of the year 1825. By this act, the corpo- 
ration was given power to take and hold, by gift, grant, devise or eminent domain, 
such real and personal property as might be necessary or convenient to promote 
the object of the incorporation in the construction of a monument in Charlestown 
"to perpetuate the memory of the early events of the American Revolution." 
Section 5 of the Acts of 1825 provided that when the monument had been completed 
it should be conveyed, together with all land purchased and held by the corpora- 
tion, to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to be held by the Commonwealth, 
"on the condition that the Commonwealth shall keep the said monument and any 
buildings for public use connected therewith in good repair forever." The corner- 
stone was laid on the seventeenth day of June, 1825. The monument was not 
finally completed, however, until the summer of 1842, the last stone being laid on 
the twenty-third of July, 1842. From that time until 1919, the Bunker Hill 
Monument Association continued to care for and maintain the monument and 
grounds through private contributions. By Chapter 79 of the General Acts of 
1919, the Metropolitan Park Commission was authorized to accept from the 
Bunker Hill Monument Association, on behalf of the Commonwealth, a convey- 
ance of the land, monument and buildings set forth in the original act of incorpo- 
ration, and thereafter maintain the land, monument and buildings for public uses 
and purposes consistent with those for which the Bunker Hill Monument Associ- 
ation was created and the monument erected. By deed recorded July 22, 1919, 
the Bunker Hill Monument Association conveyed the grounds and buildings to 
the Commonwealth, and the conveyance was accepted by the Metropolitan Park 
Commission, on behalf of the Commonwealth, so that now the responsibility for 
the proper maintenance of this historic site and monument rests with the Com- 
mission. Sufficient funds should be placed at the disposal of the Commission to 
keep this monument and the grounds around it in a condition and appearance 
consistent with the great event which they commemorate. The work of renovating 
its interior is now going on, and because of the dampness and smoke in this locality 
much care is required to maintain it in proper condition. The cost of mainten- 
ance this year has been $9,732.93, and the receipts were $3,866.80. During the 
year 38,668 people have climbed to the top of the monument. 

The budget for the Parks Division for the year 1924 amounted to $1,765,044.00. 
Only a small proportion of the people of the Metropolitan Parks District realize 
the amount of benefit derived from the Park System, — the great good for so many 
in the bathing facilities at the beaches, the opportunity for out-door exercise and 



P. D .411 9 

recreation in the Blue "FTilU and Middlesex Fells, and the conthr: he be of the 
park* a and roads by automobiles. Tne work which we are doing is lasting 
and the improvements worth while from every point of view. 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRANK G. HALL. Director cf Paris. 
December 51. 11H4. 

REPORT <;»F THE DIRECTOR AXD CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF PARK ENGINEERING 

Hon. P^ms B. Kz>~sr;: - - '-"' District Commission. 

Szf. — I reimi: ne:emm :ee::: :: me ~::£ ::if mie: ::r ? m e :"isi : z m: 
iiree: :n :: m e ELr.'irr:_i: meeirmien: :: me Firnf ZVnV.m. ::: :er yei: 
ending December 31. 19^4. 

On i.xvui: :: z::r:-r; mmm: :: m:e :em::nei :~ me lis: legislature, in 
aiimm :: — ::k gre—lmsly mmrrize: mi ne: :mrle:ei. :: — as i::^::' :: ma:e- 
:_:.e imeeasf me engineering feree in me :.:?: "t.-: ^z ami: me m:~ :es :: 
three men have been adde j, so mi: the farce ::: Sic past year has avenge as 
follows: One Chief Engineer. 1 aenim assistant ri — il engmeer. 1 ass feint civil 
engineer? : mere man list year 2 msreeeens. i resigning engineers i- n:n~:n: 
assistants 11 more than last year . 4 clerks and m : graphers. 1 garage foreman. 
1 » ■ .- . : : maeiinem 1 ele:ml:al engineer snnnniin: :ni -: iriige and 

:::n-::nnni. 

In limm :: ~:rk menmpleeei mier ~: mine :mma::s nee z " m: 
ma: :/: emsmieeim :~ Nen-r: r::me ;n: i ?e:::m :: __: i :1m" iene' 

::: : msemmim ~::k inenee: : : i : ::al : men: ?I r 1 Z*5 >4. 

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::m :: ~n:e ~e:e e: "ie ir~ iriiges ;e: me 'mmlei 7. en: mi repairs :: me 
- ;■ •;. ;;:;e me ::m :a i :mme i: Femi:e B: -m z . ' ~~ :. mi :mee mages 
::: lei erne 7i:n~i in 5 re mired emeiieraele engine-eram e: ee : me 
iegarmien: 7~: :: meie mimi mi en:- :: nn Hi: " ::i Bmiae i:r -:.:■ 
>:m:::_" eempleeei. :mmae: _e: ::: :ne me:. :ne Arsena_ Seree: :n:r : n: :ne 
Cnarles Ri~er. mi nn< and sf -::z cations completed ready to let contract for 
me J.ie: S::ee: B::im me: me Ln:e- ?./e: 

me: ~ ::n :: me ininnn: ins mriiiei me 5i:e:'een mi iirereien :: 

:ee .en m: menn:enm:e ~::n :n :ee 'e:e:> inn? : ens. "ne mvrsnginen in: :ee :::s 

e :ee nnns and :e:_es:s lot eemn:s. the supervision of the work done under 

:_r e eee- issnei :y me .e n:nn: ie: me lire, repair mi :n:ee: :: ee.e. 

1oc*l>, en 

Hie cost of conducting the department has been as follows : — 
Engme-mm 

i : een ::n:n: 
Servicea S3d.3ol 89 

Expenses 4.737 14 

-544.0S9 03 

Maintenance : 

Sa v i u e a SoO.984 89 

Exiti ir« .... . ... 2,480 45 33.465^4 



Total >*~.5-54 



ji 



The lollowaag is ■ detailed list of the work done under the direction of the 

Blue Hill* Parbmmy. — Concrete sidewalks have been built in the easterly 
: n : Bme Hills Parkway where the abutters petitioned and agreed to pay one- 
half the cost of same. A total of 7.19^ square feet has been built at a total cost 
1 ni 7€ The work was done bv John A. McCarthv. 



10 P. D.48 

Furnace Brook Parkway. — Contract No. 65 : The work of constructing con- 
necting link of Furnace Brook Parkway between Newport Avenue and Hancock 
Street, across the location of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
has been done under contract with A. G. Tomasello & Son, lowest bidder. Bids 
were received June 5, 1924. Work was begun June 12, 1924 and completed 
December 4, 1924. 

This work included the construction of a bridge for the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company to allow the parkway to pass underneath the 
railroad, and the construction and surfacing of the parkway. The total cost of 
the work has been $129,709.59. 

Plans and specifications have been prepared for building a half- tide darn in 
Black's Creek, Furnace Brook Parkway, to hold the tidal waters in the Basin 
above the parkway drive for bathing purposes. Bids were received July 31, 
1924, but on account of the provision in the act that the city of Quincy should 
accept the act and contribute a portion of the cost, which conditions the city has 
not yet wholly fulfilled, the work has not been begun. 

Middlesex Fells Parkway. — Contract No. 75: The work of extension of drain- 
age system, Middlesex Fells Parkway, between Mystic Avenue and Somerville 
Avenue, Somerville and Medford, has been done under contract with Carmine 
Russo, lowest bidder. Bids were received October 16, 1924. The work was 
begun November 1, 1924 and completed November 24, 1924, at a total cost of 
$4,281.67. 

Granolithic walks have been laid in sections of Middlesex Fells Parkway where 
the abutters have petitioned and agreed to pay one-half the cost. 1,709 square 
feet of walk have been laid under contract with C. L. Hoffman & Sons at a total 
cost of $398.77. 

Nahant Beach Parkway. — Contract No. 68: Two additional shelters have been 
built on the beach front opposite the bath house. Bids were received June 5, 
1924, and the contract awarded to Cross & Roberts, lowest bidders. Work was 
begun July 9, 1924, and completed September 15, 1924, at a total cost of $9,430.95. 

W 7 ork of grading, draining and installing playground apparatus in the area at 
the rear of the bath house has been done by the forces of the Revere Beach Division 
at a total cost of $3,023.75. A special item of $5,000 was appropriated by the 
Legislature in the maintenance appropriation for this work. It is proposed to 
install additional apparatus in the spring, as that which was installed last year 
appeared to be popular and was used extensively. 

Neponset River Parkway. — Contract No. 72 : The work of constructing section 
of Neponset River Parkway from West River Street, near the exit from Stony 
Brook Reservation, to Regent Street, Hyde Park, has been done under contract 
with Frank W T illiams, lowest bidder. Bids were received September 4, 1924. 
The work was begun September 12, 1924 and completed November 7, 1924, at a 
total cost of $10,000.00. 

Northern Traffic Artery. — The work of making surveys and preparing plans for 
acquiring land for the Northern Traffic Artery, authorized by Chapter 489, Acts 
1924, has been in progress during the year and is nearly completed. 

Old Colony Parkway. — Contract No. 40 : The work of constructing Neponset 
Bridge under contract with the Crandall Engineering Company, which was begun 
in July, 1922, is substantially completed. Traffic was turned on to the completed 
portion of the new bridge July 1, 1924, and the work of removing the temporary 
bridge and completing the Neponset approach, which could not be undertaken 
until the traffic was so diverted, was begun. The contract has not yet been closed 
as there are a few incidental items not yet completed, which could not be done 
during the winter weather. 

Contract No. 61: The work of constructing the Old Colony Parkway from 
Quincy Shore Reservation, Quincy, to Freeport Street, Dorchester, under contract 
with James H. Fannon, which was begun October 4, 1923, was completed 
December 6, 1924, at a total cost of $234,934.60. 

Considerable filling material has been obtained from various sources in the 
form of ashes, cinders and solid filling material and deposited in the section between 
Columbia Road and Fox Point. 



P. D. 48 11 

West Roxbury Parkway. — Contract No. 71 : Work of constructing West Border 
Road, from the pleasure drive to LaGrange Street, has been done under contract 
with James H. Fannon, lowest bidder. The work was begun August 28, 1924 
and was completed December 4, 1924, at a total cost of $34,653.57. 

Reservations 

Charles River Reservation, L.B. — Contract No. 64: In connection with the work 
of constructing the Western Avenue and River Street Bridges over the Charles 
River Basin, it was decided to construct a roadway along the southerly bank of 
the river between the two streets, in order to divert traffic in both directions, so 
as to use one of the bridges for the traffic in both streets during the construction 
of the other bridge. By this method the necessity of constructing temporary 
bridges was avoided. Bids were received March 27, 1924 for the construction of 
this temporary roadway and the contract awarded to the lowest bidder, Rowe 
Contracting Company. The work was begun April 3, 1924 and completed May 
27, 1924, at a total cost of $10,191.70. 

Contract No. 67: The plans and specifications for the construction of re- 
inforced concrete arch bridge and approaches over the Charles River Basin at 
Western Avenue, Boston and Cambridge, were completed and bids received for 
the work June 18, 1924. The contract was awarded to T. Stuart & Sons Company, 
lowest bidder. The work was begun June 26, 1924, and was practically com- 
pleted December 31, 1924, at a total cost of $273,605.68. 

The bridge consists of three reinforced concrete arch spans, the center span 88 
feet and the two end spans 78 feet each. The total length of the structure is 328 
feet and the width 60 feet. The new bridge was opened to traffic December 27, 1924. 

Contract No. 69: By Chapter 442, Acts 1924, the Commission was directed to 
strengthen, repave and repair the bridge on Massachusetts Avenue across the 
Charles River Basin, between Boston and Cambridge, known as the Harvard 
Bridge. Plans and specifications were prepared for the work and bids received 
July 3, 1924. The contract was awarded to V. James Grande, lowest bidder. 
The work was begun July 14, 1924, and is substantially completed. 

The work consisted of removing the old floor and stringers and strengthening 
the steel floor beams, substituting steel I beam stringers, a 6-inch yellow pine 
deck plank with 3^-inch granite block pavement laid on an asphalt mastic base 
with asphalt filler. A 12-inch concrete curb was built with concrete sidewalk 
and defective portions of the fence replaced. 

The movable draw span was fixed in a stationary position and widened to the 
full width of the other portions of the bridge. All steel was cleaned and painted. 
A new street lighting system is being installed. The cost of the work to date is 
$481,591.53 and it is estimated that the total cost will not exceed $500,000. 

Contract No. 74: Plans and specifications for bridge over the Charles River 
Basin at Arsenal Street, Boston and Watertown, have been completed and bids 
were received November 6, 1924. The contract was awarded to the lowest bidder, 
V. James Grande, but on account of lateness of season the beginning of the work 
was postponed until spring. The bridge consists of two reinforced concrete arch 
spans each 91 feet 4| inches in length. The total length of the bridge is 222.18 
feet and the width 60 feet. A temporary foot bridge will be constructed to allow 
pedestrian traffic during the construction of the work. Other traffic will be 
diverted to the North Beacon Street Bridge. 

Charles River Reservation, U. D. — To provide toilet facilities for the Riverside 
Recreation Grounds a section of one of the boat houses has been remodeled and 
fitted for the purpose, at a total cost of $3,634.13. 

Lynn Shore Reservation. — Considerable damage was caused by storms of last 
winter to a section of the Lynn Shore sea wall. This section was constructed of 
granite by the former owners of the property before its acquisition by the Com- 
mission. The work of repairs was done by M. McDonough Company of Swamp- 
scott, under the direction of this department, at a cost of $5,751. 

Lynn Woods Reservation. — As required by Chapter 39, Resolves of 1924, 
investigation, surveys and estimates have been made of routes for a parkway 
through the Lynn Woods Reservation from Walnut Street, North Saugus, to the 
streets of the City of Lynn east of the reservation. Report has been made by 



12 



P. D. 48 



the Commission dated December 15, 1924, describing two alternative routes with 
recommendation for the one beginning at the Newburyport Turnpike at junction 
of Walnut Street, thence over Walnut Street to Walden Pond Road, over Walden 
Pond Road and Penny Brook Road, widened and straightened, a distance of about 
6,500 feet, to a point near the junction of Great Woods. Thence across Tomlin's 
Swamp to a point on Way cross Road near Breeds Pond Reservoir; thence across 
two arms of Breeds Pond Reservoir and Dog Hill Island to the easterly boundary 
of the Reservation, near Linwood Street and B Street. It is proposed to cross the 
arms of the reservoir by solid filled causeways and two short span bridges to allow 
circulation of the water in the reservoir. The estimated cost of this route is 
$471,500.00. 

Nantasket Beach Reservation. — Contract No. 66 : In connection with the con- 
struction of the shelter building at the corner of Nantasket Avenue and steamboat 
landing which was completed on November 30,1923, it was necessary to construct 
concrete walks, steps, curb, fence, and fit up the interior with seats, counters, etc., 
for its use as a refectory. Bids were received April 24, 1924, and the work let to 
the lowest bidder, Archdeacon & Sullivan. The work was begun May 2, 1924 
and completed June 16, 1924, at a total cost of $9,561.65. 

Revere Beach Reservation. — Contract No. 73 : Bids were received September 
11, 1924 for the reconstruction of the reservation drive from Eliot Circle to Revere 
Street, Revere, with bituminous concrete surfacing and concrete curb. The 
contract was awarded to the lowest bidder, Simpson Brothers Corp. The work 
was begun September 29, 1924, but suspended December 4, 1924, on account of 
winter weather conditions. The work will be resumed in the early spring. 

Incidental to this work conduits were laid for the new electric street lighting 
system to be installed. Orders have been placed for the cables, and early in the 
spring it is expected to install the new lighting system which consists of magnetite 
arc lamps spaced 100 feet apart from Eliot Circle to Revere Street and 200 feet 
apart from Revere Street to Northern Circle. 

Bridges and Locks 

All work of maintenance and repair of bridges and locks and operation of draw- 
bridges has been done under the direction and supervision of this department. 

The work of breaking ice in the Charles River Basin for the season 1923 and 
1924 has been done by the Public Safety Department with boat hired for the 
purpose. The total cost has been $13,855.88. The Public Safety Department 
has built a new police boat with which it is expected that the work of ice breaking 
will be done in the future. The boat began operations in the Basin on December 
15, 1924, for this winter season. 

It is expected that important repairs to the structural steel of the drawbridge 
will be absolutely necessary during the coming year, as defects have already 
appeared which have been temporarily repaired, and there is danger of serious 
damage to the structure which will put it out of commission and prevent its opera- 
tion. An estimate for this work has been included in the budget for 1925. 

The following is a record of the traffic through locks and drawbridges during 
the year : — 

Charles River Dam and Locks 



Number of openings, 4,531 
Number of vessels, 5,855 
Number of boats, 2,926 
Lumber (feet B. M.), 2,610,000 
Coal (tons), 279,083 
Oil (barrels), 1,508,260 
Empty barrels, 24,336 



Piling (lineal feet), 12,690 
Sand (tons), 254,790 
Gravel (tons), 165,935 
Rubble stone (tons), 22,560 
Granite (tons), 2,973 
Water (gallons), 9,000 
Miscellaneous (tons), 1,500 



There were 3,171 drawbridge openings. 

The small boat lock was not used during the year. 



Number of openings, 383 
Number of boats, 520 



Cradock Bridge Lock 

Number of boats, over rollway, 84 



P. D. 48 13 

Temporary Cottage Farm Bridge 
Number of openings, 8 | Number of vessels, 15 

Maiden River Bridge 
Number of openings, 449 | Number of vessels, 750 

Neponset Bridge 
Number of openings, 635 | Number of vessels, 1,249 

Saugus River Bridge 
Number of openings, 232 | Number of vessels, 369 

Wellington Bridge 
Number of openings, 167 | Number of vessels, 242 

General 

The road repairs and maintenance have been done by the forces of the various 
divisions under the supervision and direction of the Engineering Department. 

All bridges under the care and control of the Commission have been inspected 
twice during the year and estimates of cost of repairs included in the budget. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. RABLIN, Chief Engineer & Director of Park Engineering. 

February 16, 1925. 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF WATER DIVISION 

Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Sir : — I respectfully submit the following report of the construction and main- 
tenance operations of the Water Division for the calendar year 1924. 

ORGANIZATION 

The organization and personnel of the supervising, clerical and engineering 
forces employed on maintenance work have remained substantially as at the 
beginning of the year. The forces employed on construction work have been 
increased by the appointment of several rodmen, instrumentmen and inspectors 
as required to attend to the increased amount of new work in progress. At the 
beginning of the year the number of these employees was 47 and at the end of the 
year 53, and in addition the labor forces engaged in maintaining and operating the 
reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, hydro-electric stations and pumping stations 
and doing miscellaneous construction work was 330 at the beginning of the year 
and 342 at the end of the year. 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT AND WORKS 

During the year there has been no change in the boundaries of the Metropolitan 
Water District which includes 19 municipalities with an area of 167 square miles 
and an estimated population of 1,358,110. The water works lands include an 
area of about 19,000 acres of which about 2,000 acres have been planted with pine 
trees. The works include 9 storage reservoirs with 200 square miles of tributary 
watershed, storage capacity of 80,000,000,000 gallons and water surface of 8,600 
acres; 60 miles of aqueducts; 2 hydro-electric power stations with a capacity of 
7,000 horse power; 16 miles of high tension power transmission line; 5 distribu- 
tion pumping stations with a combined equipment of 6,000 horse power and 
pumping capacity of 260,000,000 gallons a day; 12 distribution reservoirs with a 
combined capacity of 2,400,000,000 gallons and 136.14 miles of distribution mains. 
The consumption of water from these works during the year was 45,420,493,000 
gallons, equivalent to an average daily consumption of 124,099,700 gallons, or 95 
gallons per capita supplied. 



14 P. D. 48 

CONSTRUCTION 

Pumping Equipment, Southern High Service 
The work done this year in connection with the installation of the new pumping 
equipment at Chestnut Hill Station No. 1 for the southern high service includes 
the erection of an air chamber on the 30-inch discharge pipe from the new engine 
and the installation of a new smoke flue, soot blower, boiler feed water piping 
and blow-off drains, the application of the heat insulating covering and completion 
of the concrete floor in the boiler room. The entire work was completed April 1. 
The total expenditure for the additional southern high-service equipment is 
$183,069.90 of which $2,957.55 was expended during 1924. 

Arlington Reservoir 

At the beginning of the year about 95 per cent of the work on the masonry tower 
which encloses the Arlington Reservoir was completed. Early in the spring, as 
soon as the weather was favorable, the work of plastering balcony wall, water- 
proofing roof and washing down the masonry was undertaken and it was com- 
pleted in June. Late in the fall the grounds surrounding the reservoir were 
graded and seeded and some shrubs were planted. 

The total expenditure for. the reservoir is $226,804.07, of which $46,456.62 was 
expended during 1924. 

Pumping Equipment, Northern High Service 

The concrete foundation for the new pumping engine at Spot Pond Station for 
the northern high service was completed July 1. The work of building new 
engine for this station was completed at the Snow-Holly Works of the Worthington 
Pump and Machinery Corporation in Buffalo in October, the work of erecting 
it upon the foundation in the pumping station was begun in October and was 
nearly completed at the close of the year, and the installation of the suction and 
discharge piping was practically completed at that time. 

The gallery in the boiler room was extended to the new boiler, and heat insulating 
covering was applied to the boiler and parts of the smoke flue and steam piping. 

An order for the steel frame work to support the cast-iron floor plates at the 
new engine was placed December 18. 

The total expenditure for the northern high-service pumping equipment is 
$85,258.01, of which $69,240.85 was expended during 1924. 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains 

At the beginning of the year about 60 per cent was completed of the work of 
laying two additional 60-inch cast-iron pipe lines on Section 1 of the Weston 
Aqueduct Supply Mains in Weston, extending from the terminal chamber of the 
Aqueduct to the Charles River. Work was continued through the winter by 
Bryne & Company with a small force and was completed June 23. The com- 
bined length of the two pipe lines laid is 3,239 feet. A new sluice gate and two 
new gate stands were installed in the terminal chamber for controlling the flow of 
water in the new pipe lines. 

A contract was made with the T. A. Gillespie Company, February 1, for fur- 
nishing and laying 60-inch diameter lockbar steel pipes included in Section 9, 
extending northerly from pipe laid on Section 1, through River Street in Weston 
and South Street and private land in Waltham to Prospect Street. The first 
pipes were delivered for this work March 24, and pipe laying work was begun 
April 17 and completed September 19. The total length of pipe laid is 11,365 
feet. The entire work under this contract was completed October 14. 

A contract was made with the C. & R. Construction Company July 10, for 
furnishing and laying lockbar steel pipes 60 inches in diameter for Section 10 of 
the Supply Mains, extending northerly and easterly in Waltham from Section 9 at 
Prospect Street, through Sun, Fern and Felton streets, crossing the Common and 
through Central, Newton, Barton and Linden streets and Waverley Oaks Road 
to Beaver Brook Reservation. 

The work of excavating trench and relocating existing underground structures 
was begun July 28, of delivering pipes September 19, and of laying pipes September 
28. Although working most of the time in narrow streets with numerous under- 
ground structures good progress has been made on this section of the work, 



P. D. 48 15 

8,335 linear feet of pipe line having been laid when work was suspended for the 
winter at the close of the year. 

A contract was made with the T. A. Gillespie Company October 3 for furnishing 
and laying lockbar steel pipes 56 inches in diameter on Section 11 of the Supply 
Mains, extending northerly and easterly from Section 10, through Beaver Brook 
Reservation, Trapelo Road and Pleasant Street in Belmont and Pleasant Street 
in Arlington to Massachusetts Avenue at Medford Street. 

The work of excavating trench and relocating undergound structures was 
begun November 5, delivery of pipes November 17 and of laying pipes November 
23. At the close of the year 2,830 feet of pipe line had been laid. 

The total expenditure for the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains is $828,147.81 of 
which $731,497.76 was expended during the year, and there are reserves held 
under current contracts amounting to $61,185.29. 

During the year easements for laying and maintaining water mains were taken 
in 7.058 acres of land in Waltham. 

MAINTENANCE 

Precipitation and Yield of Watersheds 

The precipitation on all the watersheds was noticeably above normal in April 
and September and noticeably below normal in March, June, July, October and 
December. The total precipitation for the year is 38.63 inches or 6.68 inches 
below the average on the Wachusett Watershed; 36.96 inches or 7.56 inches below 
the average on the Sudbury Watershed, and 37.40 inches or 7.74 inches below the 
average on the Cochituate Watershed. 

The average daily yields of the watersheds for the year in gallons per day per 
square mile were 1,035,000 or about 6 per cent below the average for the past 28 
years on the Wachusett Watershed; 841,000 or 13.9 per cent below the average for 
the past 50 years on the Sudbury Watershed, and 810,000 or 13 per cent below 
the average for the past 62 years on the Cochituate Watershed. 

From October 8 to November 11 no precipitation was measured on any of the 
watersheds, while the total precipitation from September 30 to November 22 
w T as only }/& of an inch on the Wachusett Watershed and }/% of an inch on the 
Sudbury Watershed. 

The city of Worcester discharged 975,500,000 gallons of water into the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir Watershed from the area diverted in 1911 that was formerly tribu- 
tary to the reservoir, but as all of the water was received before June 15 and the 
reservoir filled before that date no payment is required for this water under the 
agreement made with the city when the area was diverted. 

Storage Reservoirs 

The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water Works, the 
elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water stored in each reservoir 
at the beginning and at the end of the year are shown by the following table : — 



, 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water 


Capacity 
(Gallons) 


Jan. 1, 1924 


Jan. 1, 1925 


Storage Reservoirs 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 
Surface 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 
Surface 


Amount 

Stored 

(Gallons) 


Cochituate Watershed : — 

Lake Cochituate 2 . . . 
Sudbury Watershed : — 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

Ashland Reservoir . 

Hopkinton Reservoir 

Whitehall Reservoir 

Farm Pond .... 
Wachusett Watershed : — 

W T achusett Reservoir 


144.36 

260.00 
169.32 
177.87 
186.74 
225.21 
305.00 
337.91 
159.25 

395.00 


2,097,100,000 

7,253,500,000 

289,900,000 3 

529,900,000 3 

1,180,000,000 3 

1,416,400,000 

1,520,900,000 

1,256,900,000 

167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 


142.81 

258.23 
167.95 
177.38 
186.08 
224.59 
304.25 
336.63 
158.20 

386.77 


1,732,100,000 

6,516,400,000 

226,900,000 

541,000,000 

1,146,000,000 

1,382,300,000 

1,473,900,000 

1,009,400,000 

111,700,000 

54,253,100,000 


143.49 

258.17 
167.65 
177.49 
184.00 
223.26 
302.93 
337.38 
158.16 

379.98 


1,891,100,000 

6,491,700,000 

214,000,000 

545,900,000 

979,400,000 

1,310,000,000 

1,392,400,000 

1,153,600,000 

109,600,000 

46,296,600,000 




- 


80,680,100,000 


- 


68,392,800,000 


- 


60,384,300,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 



3 To top of flashboards. 



16 P. D. 48 

The table shows the total storage which could be drained from the reservoirs. 
Special provisions would be necessary, however, to draw about 10,000,000,000 
gallons of this storage for consumption, as it is below the outlet channels which 
can be conveniently used for regular service. 

Wachusett Reservoir 

At the beginning of the year there was 54,253,100,000 gallons of water in the 
Wachusett Reservoir, the water being 8.23 feet below elevation 395, the designed 
high-water line. As a result of the spring rains and thaws considerable water 
was collected in the reservoir during the last week in March and early in April. 
Elevation 395 was reached April 7 and with the use of flash-boards the water was 
raised to elevation 396.3 by April 14, and was maintained near this elevation for 
about six weeks, the highest stage being elevation 396.39 on May 13 with 66,852,- 
100,000 gallons in storage. This is the largest quantity of water ever stored in 
the reservoir. 

From April 7 to May 31 flood flows amounting to 10,021,600,000 gallons or 
nearly 20 per cent of the available capacity of the reservoir, which could not be 
stored in the reservoir, was discharged into the Nashua River below the dam, and 
4,029,500,000 gallons of this waste water was used to generate 856,420 kilowatt 
hours of electric energy, which was sold for $4,539. 

The maximum rate at which water was wasted from the reservoir was 960,000,000 
gallons per day for a short time on April 19. After May 31 the draft for consump- 
tion exceeded the inflow and during the remainder of the year the water was 
drawn down steadily to elevation 379.98 or 15.02 feet below high-water line, leaving 
46,296,600,000 gallons in storage at the close of the year. In addition to the 
water unavoidably wasted on account of flood flows 632,700,000 gallons was dis- 
charged into the river below the dam in accordance with the provision of General 
Laws, Chapter 92, Section 14, and under the provision of Acts of 1923 Chapter 348 
the town of Clinton arranged with the Lancaster Mills for the installation and 
operation of a permanent pumping plant at the mill by which water from the 
reservoir is drawn from the Metropolitan Water Works 24-inch supply main and 
pumped into the town's distribution pipes. Since this plant was put into regular 
service on June 24 it has been operated almost continuously except on Sundays 
and holidays, with a total pumpage of 92,300,000 gallons. 

Under an extension of authority granted by the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission October 18, 1923, the city of Worcester again operated its emergency 
pumping station on the shore of the reservoir at South Bay in Boylston and from 
November 10 to the close of the year pumped 240,200,000 gallons of water from 
the reservoir into its high-service mains. At the close of the year on account of 
continued low yield from its watersheds the city is installing a third pumping 
unit in the emergency station to increase the pumping capacity from 5,000,000 
gallons per day to 7,000,000 gallons per day. 

The usual work has been done in connection with the maintenance of the reser- 
voir, brush and weeds have been cut and burned along the margin of the reservoir 
adjacent to highways and directly tributary streams for a distance of 64 miles at 
a cost of $7,100. 

The brook channel just west of the junction of Worcester Street and Beaman 
Street in West Boylston was paved for a further length of 225 feet this year, com- 
pleting the work at this place. 

Riprap along the shore of the reservoir for a distance of 7,000 feet, washed out 
by the high water in the spring, was repaired and reinforced with heavier stones 
at a cost of $2,200. 

Wire fences were erected along highways and property lines to enclose the 
water works lands for a distance of 6% miles in Clinton, Sterling and West 
Boylston at a cost of $1,350 per mile exclusive of the posts obtained from the 
water works lands. 

The structures at the Wachusett Dam, Clinton and Oakdale storage yards and 
eight department houses in the Wachusett Section, and the surrounding lands 
have been given the necessary attention. At the offices in the power station the 
woodwork was painted and new electric fixtures were installed. 



P. D. 48 17 

The manometer on the 12-inch Venturi meter in the power station was replaced 
with a Type M register for measuring the flow in the 24-inch supply main to the 
Lancaster Mills, and the hydraulic valves were repaired. Windows in the gate 
chamber, damaged by the wind storm of May 24, were repaired and the boat 
landing at the dam, which was also damaged by this storm, was rebuilt. 

At the Kramer house in Clinton a heater and electric lights were installed. At 
the Cook house in West Boylston, alterations were made on the first floor and 
the whole interior was renovated. At the Howe house in Sterling a bath room 
and electrically operated water supply were installed. 

Standing grass on about 250 acres of water works land was sold, largely at 
auction, and $786 was received therefor. As the grass was of poor quality there 
was little competition among the bidders. 

Sudbury Reservoir 

The water in Sudbury Reservoir was kept about 9 inches below the crest of the 
overflow at the dam until April 12 when the flash -boards were replaced on the 
overflow, and from December 3, when the flash-boards were removed, until the 
close of the year. From April 12 to December 3, while the flash-boards were on 
the overflow, water in the reservoir was kept about 6 inches above the crest of 
the overflow. 

With the exception of 3,800,000 gallons of water that passed over the crest on 
March 11 and 12, due to a sudden and unexpected yield from the watershed, all 
the water drawn from the reservoir was used in generating electric energy at the 
Sudbury Power Station. 

The usual care has been taken of the reservoir margins and of the walks, drives, 
shrubbery and grounds below the dam. 

The department house, barn, shop and storehouse at the dam and all ironwork 
and life buoys have been painted. The upper tenement in the house at the dam 
has been vacant since April 28. The old Cratty house at Fayville was removed 
on July 30 by John Phillipo who had occupied it for many years while employed 
on the works. 

Short sections of old fence have been repaired and 880 feet of new fencing has 
been constructed. 

* Framingham Reservoir No. 3 

The entire water supply for the Water District has been drawn from the Sudbury 
Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and the water in these reservoirs has 
been kept at the desired elevation by drawing water from the Wachusett Reservoir 
as required. 

The water in Framingham Reservoir No. 3 reached the highest stage in April, 
when it rose to elevation 186.80 or 0.3 of a foot above the top of the flash-boards, 
and was at the lowest stage, elevation 180.82, in November, when it was drawn 
down several feet below the overflow while the masonry was being repaired. The 
flash-boards were kept on the overflow throughout the year except when the 
repairs were in progress. During the year, 1,711,200,000 gallons of water not 
required for consumption or storage was wasted from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 3 into Framingham Reservoir No. 1 and thence into the Sudbury River 
below Dam No. 1. 

The shores of the reservoir, the embankments, the grounds and shrubbery at 
the dam, and the gate-house and other structures were cared for as usual. Leaks 
in the stone masonry at the overflow in the dam were repaired late in the fall. 
Sprouts and undergrowth in the lanes through the woods along the property lines 
were cut and burned. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs 

No water was drawn for consumption during the year from the 47 square miles 
of the South Sudbury watershed tributary to Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, 
Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs as the water from this portion of 
the Sudbury Watershed is usually highly colored and unsuitable for use without 
purification. At least 1,500,000 gallons of water a day has been wasted from 
Framingham Reservoir No. 1 into the Sudbury River below Dam No. 1 as required 
by Acts of 1872, Chapter 177. 



18 P. D. 48 

On November 19, 20, 24 and 25, after the town of Framingham had completed 
the new pipe line connecting its pumping station with the Sudbury Aqueduct, 
106,600,000 gallons of water was drawn from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 
and 2 to fill up Farm Pond which had been drawn down to facilitate work on the 
pipe line. 

At the beginning of the year the water in Whitehall Reservoir was about 15 
inches below high-water line on account of its having been drawn off to facilitate 
work on the new gate-house at the outlet, but during the year this reservoir has 
filled within 6 inches of high-water line. The elevation of the water in the other 
reservoirs has been varied as usual to provide for the seasonable requirements. 

The dams, gate-houses and other structures and the lands about these reservoirs 
have been given the usual attention, and the lanes in the woods along the property 
lines have been cleared of sprouts and brush. 

The department house on Salem End Road in Framingham, known as the 
Bullard house, occupied by the foreman in charge of these reservoirs, was painted. 

At Ashland Reservoir 6,950 feet of wire fencing was built along the property 
line on the easterly side of the reservoir. 

Farm. Pond 

On June 27 the stop-planks at the outlet of Farm Pond were removed to lower 
the water in the pond to facilitate the laying of a 16-inch cast-iron pipe line around 
the northerly end of the pond by the town of Framingham, to connect the town's 
pumping station with the Sudbury Aqueduct and to replace the old pipe line which 
is not suitable for further use. 

In September the town set up an 8-inch and a 15-inch centrifugal pump near 
the outlet and pumped water out of the pond to lower it more rapidly, and on 
September 29 the work of laying the pipe line was begun with the water in the 
pond at elevation 155.20 or 4.0 feet below high-water line. The pipe line was laid 
with lead joints, with its top at about elevation 153 and was covered with earth 
about two feet deep. Work was completed, the old pipe line was discontinued 
and new pipe line put into service November 9, and since then the entire water 
supply of the town has been obtained from the Sudbury Aqueduct. November 
19, 20, 24 and 25 the pond was refilled to elevation 158.02 with 106,600,000 gallons 
of water drawn from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2. 

Prior to November 9, when the new pipe line was put into service, the town 
pumped approximately 128,900,000 gallons of water from its filter-galleries on the 
easterly shore of the pond, and during the year, under rights reserved by legisla- 
tion, the Boston & Albany Railroad took approximately 71,600,000 gallons of 
water from the pond, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad took 
approximately 64,400,000 gallons of water from the pond for use of locomotives. 

The riprap protection on the aqueduct embankment in the pond was repaired 
while the water was drawn down below the usual elevation. 

A parcel of land situated on Hollis Street in Framingham, containing 0.32 of 
an acre, which was acquired by the city of Boston in 1872 in connection with the 
construction of a temporary channel to divert water from Farm Pond into Beaver 
Dam Brook to reinforce the supply in Lake Cochituate while the Sudbury River 
works were being constructed, was conveyed to James A. Turner. 

Lake Cochituate 

The water in Lake Cochituate was held about one foot below high-water line for 
use as an auxiliary supply in case of emergency, but no water was drawn from the 
lake for consumption during the year. 

The lanes through the woods along property lines were cleared and the grounds, 
fences and structures on the shores of the lake and the channel for the diversion 
of surface water from Cochituate village were kept in good condition. 

New wire fencing was erected along the property lines near Pegan Brook for a 
distance of 1,529 feet. The barn and shed at the foreman's headquarters and the 
ironwork at the gate-house and outlet dam were painted. A new furnace was 
installed in the department house, occupied by the foreman, and the plumbing 
was renewed in the kitchen. 



P. D. 48 19 

Aqueducts 
Wachusett Aqueduct 

Water was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aque- 
duct on 294 days. The total time that the aqueduct was in use is equivalent to 
137 days, 5 hours and 31 minutes, during which time the total quantity of water 
discharged was 39,106,000,000 gallons, equivalent to 106,847,000 gallons per day 
for the entire year. All of the water was used to generate electric energy at the 
power station before it was discharged into the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 71,722,000 gallons of Water from the 
aqueduct at the terminal chamber during the year, or an average of 196,000 
gallons per day. 

New wire fencing was erected along property lines for a distance of 900 feet. 
A single story wooden frame building 19 feet by 28 feet was built by the regular 
maintenance force, largely from materials on hand, as an addition to the workshop 
near the terminal chamber. 

The iron fences at the bridges over the Assabet River and at the highway cross- 
ings, and at the upper and lower dams of the open channel were painted. 

A parcel of land containing 1.66 acres near the open channel in Southborough 
was transferred to the Commonwealth by James B. Johnson in exchange for a 
right of way to his land over the aqueduct land. 

Brush, grass and weeds were mowed and disposed of for a distance of 10 miles 
along the aqueduct at a cost of about $200 per mile. 

In order to rectify the property lines Wachusett Aqueduct lands in South- 
borough were exchanged with adjoining owners as follows: The Commonwealth 
conveyed 0.05 of an acre of land to James B. and Lexy C. Johnson and acquired 
0.05 of an acre in exchange; the Commonwealth conveyed 0.233 of an acre to 
Clarissa F. Clapp and received 0.183 of an acre in exchange; the Commonwealth 
conveyed 0.101 of an acre to Helen L. and Alida C. Masten and acquired 0.024 of 
an acre in exchange. 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was shut off from regular service on four occasions; 
on May 12 for 15 hours to install new and larger piping for the recording gage at 
the Farm Pond gate-house; on September 30 for 4 hours to inspect the regulating 
gate at the entrance to the aqueduct at Dam No. 1; on November 19 and 20 for 
173^2 hours and on November 24 and 25 for 17^2 hours while refilling Farm Pond. 
With these exceptions the aqueduct has been in continuous use for drawing water 
from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 from which 21,542,700,000 gallons was drawn 
during the year, of which 326,000,000 gallons was pumped by the town of Framing- 
ham to supplement its supply from the filter-galleries at Farm Pond and 21,216,- 
700,000 gallons, or an average of 57,969,100 gallons per day was delivered to the 
Chestnut Hill distributing reservoir for consumption in the Water District. 

The regulating gate at the upper end of the aqueduct near Dam No. 1, which 
had worked loose in the masonry as a result of the vibration caused by the flow of 
the water, was securely fastened with iron braces and the brick masonry was 
repaired. 

The work of cutting and disposing of grass, brush and weeds, painting iron- 
work, cleaning culverts and repairing fences and caring for the aqueduct lands 
and structures was attended to as usual. 

Weston Aqueduct 

The Weston Aqueduct is not usually in service on Sundays and holidays. Water 
was drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir into the aqueduct this year on 309 days, 
the total time which the aqueduct was in use being 219 days, 2 hours and 20 min- 
utes, and the total quantity of water drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir and dis- 
charged through the Weston Aqueduct into Weston Reservoir was 22,943,200,000 
gallons for consumption, equivalent to an average of 62,686,300 gallons per day. 

The ironwork under the floor in the head-house and the iron and wood work 
in the siphon and gaging chambers and all manhole covers along the aqueduct 
line were painted. 



20 P. D. 48 

Grass, weeds and brush were cut and disposed of along the aqueduct and the 
culverts were cleaned of sediment and kept free from snow and ice during the 
winter. Fences were repaired where necessary. 

A new furnace was installed in the department house at Nobscot, known as the 
White place, and plumbing was repaired in the kitchen. This house was vacant 
from April 15 until June 16. 

On September 18 a parcel of Weston Aqueduct land situated in Weston, no 
longer required for water works purposes, containing 3.54 acres, was conveyed by 
the Commonwealth to Louis W. Deane. 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was not in use during the year but was kept in readi- 
ness for immediate use in case of emergency. The ironwork in the waste-weirs 
and all manhole covers along the aqueduct have been painted. Grass, brush and 
weeds along the line have been cut and disposed of and the culverts were kept 
clear of snow and ice during the winter. 

An exchange was made of Cochituate Aqueduct land located near the junction 
of Commonwealth Avenue and Grant Avenue in Newton, by which the Common- 
wealth conveyed 291 square feet of land to Frederick A. Ward and others and 
acquired 805 square feet of land. 

Protection of Water Supply 

A sanitary inspector, two watershed inspectors and three watchmen were em- 
ployed throughout the year to inspect the condition of premises on the water- 
sheds and ice cutting operations and to prevent pollution of the water in the 
reservoirs. Filters have been operated at Sterling, Sterling Junction, West Boyl- 
ston, Marlborough and Natick throughout the year to prevent pollution of the 
water supply at these places, and any large flows of surface water in excess of the 
capacity of the filters was sterilized with calcium hypochlorite before it entered 
the reservoirs. 

The pumping station and filters at Pegan Brook, used for purifying the water 
of Pegan Brook in Natick before it enters Lake Cochituate, have been operated 
when necessary during the year. The pumping station was operated on 199 days 
and 299,790,000 gallons of surface water was pumped from the brook to the filter- 
beds. This is equivalent to an average flow of 819,098 gallons per day for the 
entire year. The cost of operating the station, including the care of the grounds 
and filter-beds was $7,074.14, or at the rate of $23.60 per million gallons pumped 
and filtered. 

About 1,800 cubic yards of mud and silt which had collected in settling basin on 
Marlborough Brook above the filter-beds was removed and disposed of on adjoining 
land. 

Wire fencing was constructed along 1,710 feet in Big Crane Swamp, Northbor- 
ough, to keep cattle on the adjoining farms from having access to the drainage 
ditches. Three sections of drainage ditches constructed during 1897 in Big Crane 
Swamp in Northborough and Westborough were reconstructed for an aggregate 
length of 4,565 feet by deepening, replacing most of the board bottom, sills and 
corner strips and repaving with heavier stones. This work included the replace- 
ment of four wooden bridges at cart road crossings, one with a 24-inch iron pipe 
culvert with concrete headwalls and the other three with concrete box culverts. 
This work cost about $4,500. 

Swamp drainage ditches of an aggregate length of 37 miles were given the usual 
attention and brush and weeds were cut for a width of 10 to 20 feet along both 
banks, the sediment being removed from the ditches, culverts and watering places 
and repairs made. 

The bed of the brook between East Waushacum Pond and Middle Waushacum. 
Pond in Sterling was improved for a distance of about 2,300 feet by deepening, 
widening and grading so as to lower the water in the East Pond to the minimum 
elevation to which we have the right to draw down the water. 

A parcel of land containing 0.08 of an acre with buildings thereon, located on 
the west shore of Middle Waushacum Pond in Sterling, was acquired from Edith M. 
Loring for the protection of the water supply. 



P. D. 48 21 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works 

The works for disposing of the sewage of the town of Clinton were operated as 
required by Acts of 1898, Chapter 557. From April 7 to 28, inclusive, May 1 and 2, 
May 13 to 18, inclusive, the sewage flow exceeded the capacity of the pump and 
overflowed into the Nashua River but was properly purified by dilution with the 
large quantity of waste water from the Wachusett Reservoir. On the remaining 
337 days the sewage was pumped to the filter-beds and averaged 1,422,000 gallons 
per day. The cost of operating the pumping station was $3,701.06 or $0,155 per 
million foot gallons of sewage pumped, about 45 per cent of the cost being for 
labor. The cost of operating the filters and irrigation area, which it was necessary 
to use from March 31 to April 6, inclusive, and from September 22 to October 13, 
inclusive, because of the inadequate capacity of the filter-beds, was $9,833.06, or 
at the rate of $20.52 per million gallons of sewage disposed of. 

The electric transmission line, over which power is transmitted from the Wachu- 
sett Dam for operating the pumping station, was rebuilt for a distance of 4,400 
feet through Boylston, Chestnut and Mechanic Streets in Clinton. 

The two department houses on High Street in Lancaster near the filter-beds were 
painted on the outside. 

Forestry 

In the Wachusett Section 31,000 red pines three years old were planted on 
26 acres of water works land along streams in Holden and Sterling tributary to the 
Wachusett Reservoir, on the shores of the reservoir in West Boylston, along the 
open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct in Marlborough and at the head of 
Big Crane Swamp in Westborough. 

In the Sudbury Section 300 white pines from four to six feet high were set out 
between the Boston Road and the swimming pool in Southborough, and 5,000 
white pines 4 years old were set out on the Weston Aqueduct land in Nobscot. 

In the Distribution Section 25,000 white pines and 3,000 hemlocks three years 
old were set out on the westerly and southerly shore of Spot Pond in Stoneham, 
and 150 white pines five to six years old were set out on the shore of the Weston 
Reservoir at Cooper's Cove. 

The nursery work included transplanting of 9,000 red pines three years old 
and 5,000 mugho pines one to three inches high in the Wachusett Section Nursery 
at Oakdale, and of 15,000 red pines two years old, 1,000 red pines three years old, 
9,000 Norway spruces four years old and 2,000 mugho pines one year old in the 
Sudbury Section Nursery in Southborough. There are now about 39,000 plants 
in the Wachusett Section Nursery and 45,000 plants in the Sudbury Section 
nursery. 

About 11 acres of Wachusett Reservoir land in West Boylston and along the 
open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct in Marlborough was cleared for planting. 
Improvement cuttings were made in about 10 acres of hard wood growth and 134 
acres of pine plantings on the Wachusett Reservoir lands. 

As a fire preventive measure the undergrowth was cut in the plantings along 
the highways on an area of about 85 acres in the Wachusett Section and about 
100 acres in the Sudbury Section. 

The marginal fire guards and forest roads from 15 to 45 feet in width were 
mowed for a length of 43 miles in the Wachusett Section and of 21 miles in the 
Sudbury Section. 

The usual work was done to protect the plantings from the pine tree weevil 
and trees on selected areas from insects. About 850 currant and gooseberry bushes 
were destroyed as a protection against the white pine blister rust. 

The total expenditure for forestry for the year is $34,780 of which $5,800 was 
expended for protecting the trees from insects. 

Cordwood, fence posts and lumber have been obtained from operations of the 
department, including 35,000 board measure feet of first quality white pine timber 
from cuttings of matured trees in the groves near the foreman's house at Lake 
Cochituate, and 3,600 chestnut posts and 12,000 board measure feet of chestnut 
lumber cut on the Sudbury Reservoir land, and all of the chestnut fence posts 
used in building fences in the Wachusett Section, which were cut on the Wachusett 
Reservoir lands. 



22 P. D. 48 

The cutting of standing chestnut timber and intergrown white pine and hard- 
wood trees on about 825 acres of Wachusett Reservoir land, which was begun by 
the Wilder, Walker & Davis Company, of Sterling, December 20, 1923, has been 
in progress throughout the year and in accordance with the terms of the contract 
$8 ; 450 has been paid by the Company. As the total amount to be paid by the 
Company for the timber to be cut under this contract is $9,750, about 87 per cent 
of the work was completed at the close of the year. 

Hydro-electric Service 
During the year 14,160,286 kilowatt hours of electric energy were delivered 
from the hydro-electric stations operated by water drawn from the Wachusett 
and Sudbury reservoirs. The total value of this energy at contract prices, includ- 
ing rentals of $139 for transmission line locations, is $79,271.54. The total expense 
charged to operation of both stations and transmission lines is $44,358.40, leaving 
a profit from the operation of the stations of $34,913.14, equivalent to $2,466 per 
thousand kilowatt hours. Of the total energy delivered from both stations this 
year, 1,068,863 kilowatt hours of energy, for which $5,866.77 was received, were 
generated with water wasted from the reservoirs and not required for water supply. 

Wachusett Service 

Additional line switches were installed at the switchboard in the Wachusett 
Power Station to facilitate operations. A cracked wedge in the 48-inch hydraulic 
gate on the No. 4 penstock line was repaired with stay bolts and fitted with a new 
and heavy composition stem nut. 

A partial interruption in the running of the station occurred on January 22 when 
anchor ice which formed on the reservoir during the preceding night as a result of 
the action of the extremely low temperature and very high wind on the open water 
in the reservoir. The ice crystals which formed under these conditions were 
churned up with the water and blown against the dam, where they were drawn 
against the screens in the screen chamber, closing the openings in the screens, 
which were broken and carried with the ice through the penstock lines and 
water wheels causing some damage to the wicket gates. This is the first case 
where trouble of this nature has developed during the thirteen years of operation. 

During the severe blizzard of March 11 and 12 the Wachusett Station was in 
continuous operation for about 36 hours, the service from all other stations in the 
vicinity being interrupted during this period. 

The Wachusett Power Station was operated on 294 days. The statistics for the 
year 1924 are as follows: — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) 9,069,500 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) 178,410 



Available energy (kilowatt hours) 8,891,090 

Water used (gallons) 43,135,500.000 

Average head (feet) 94 . 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) . . 2 . 237 

Efficiency of station (per cent) 71 . 18 

Credits : 

Energy sold New England Power Company and 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 8,705,018 
kilowatt hours at $0.0053 .... . $46,136 60 

Deduction of 2 per cent as provided in contract, 

174,100 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 . . . 922 73 



$45,213 87 



Energy furnished Clinton Sewerage Pumping Station, 

186,072 kilowatt hours at $0.0053 $986 18 

Rental, transmission line location 139 00 



$46,339 05 



P. D. 48 

Charges : 

Superintendence 
Labor, operating station 

Repairs and supplies: 

Power station, $1,598 53 

Transmission line 97 94 



Taxes 

Administration, general supervision, interest and sink- 
ing fund 

Profit 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours . 



23 



$1,159 61 
10,016 81 

1,696 47 



$12,872 89 
3,250 00 

8,995 06 25,117 95 



$21,221 10 
$2,825 



Sudbury Service 

The Sudbury Power Station was in service on 309 days during the year and, 
with the exception of 3,800,000 gallons of water wasted over the dam in March, 
all the water drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir was used to generate electricity. 

Statistics for the year 1924 are as follows: — 



Total energy developed (kilowatt hours) 
Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours) 

Available energy (kilowatt hours) . 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service : 

Water used (gallons) 

Average head (feet) ..... 

Weston Aqueduct Service: 

Water used (gallons) 

Average head (feet) 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours) 

Efficiency of station (per cent) 

Credits : 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, 
5,269,196 kilowatt hours at $0.00625 
Charges : 

Superintendence 

Labor, operating station .... 

Repairs and supplies 



5,278,550 
9,354 

$5,269,196 

22,771,300,000 
66.04 



23,441,800,000 

38.13 

2 . 202 

70.1 



$32,932 49 



$1,401 70 
10,710 75 

413 82 



Taxes . 

Administration, general supervision, interest and sink- 
ing fund 

Profit 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours . 



$12,526 27 
1,860 00 



4,854 18 19,240 45 



$13,692 04 
$3,651 



Distribution Pumping Stations 

The total pumpage at the five distribution pumping stations during 1924 was 
34,439,629,000 gallons; 175,267,000 gallons or 0.5 per cent less than in 1923. 
The cost of operating all of the pumping stations for the year 1924 was $197,576.19. 

At the beginning of the year there were 1,902 net tons of bituminous coal and 
1,092 net tons of anthracite screenings on hand at the pumping stations. During 
the year, 7,769 net tons of bituminous coal and 3,042 net tons of anthracite screen- 
ings were received. At the close of the year 1,100 net tons of bituminous coal 
and 550 net tons of anthracite screenings were on hand at the pumping stations. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 1 a new pinion and gear were installed for engine 
No. 16 governor drive. The governor was securely braced to prevent vibration 
and now operates in a satisfactory manner. The difficulty of maintaining air in 



24 P. D. 48 

the discharge air chamber in Engine No. 16 was remedied by removing the old 
baffle diaphragms from the equalizer pipes and installing two new diaphragms 
with openings 2 inches in diameter. 

A new baffle plate was installed to improve the operation of the coal conveyor. 
The work of relocating flue and economizer and installing soot blower was com- 
pleted and they were put into regular service early in the year. 

In January a fire was discovered in the coal stored in bins Nos. 2 and 3 at Station 
No. 1, which had heated in storage, and it was necessary to remove about 240 
tons from the bins and pile it on the grounds outside the building and later move 
it back for use in the station. This work cost about $713 and in addition consid- 
erable damage was done to runs and partitions in the building. 

At Chestnut Hill Station No. 2 necessary repairs have been made on all the 
engines and to the boilers and economizers. On account of the reduction in the 
force employed at the Chestnut Hill stations it was not possible to do considerable 
work that should have been done to keep the plant in first class condition. The 
more important repairs have been made, so far as possible, with the force available. 

At the Spot Pond Pumping Station the work of relocating the 8-inch steam main 
in connection with the installation of the new 5-inch steam main was completed, 
and a Westinghouse turbo generator lighting unit <A Vy% kilowatts capacity was 
installed for use at times when the large unit is not required. 

The usual miscellaneous repairs have been made at the Arlington and Hyde 
Park stations during the year. 

All machine shop work for the pumping stations and other sections of the Water 
Division has been done at the machine shop at the Chestnut Hill pumping stations. 

The station duties based on plunger displacement and with no allowance for 
steam used for heating and lighting have averaged as follows: — 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 1, 105,739,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed 
coal averaging 13,500 British thermal units per pound. 

Chestnut Hill Station No. 2, 131,368,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed 
coal averaging 13,500 British thermal units per pound. 

Spot Pond Station, 112,367,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal aver- 
aging 13,800 British thermal units per pound. 

Arlington Station, 66,662,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal aver- 
aging 13,300 British thermal units per pound. 

Hyde Park Station, 56,780,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of mixed coal aver- 
aging 13,100 British thermal units per pound. 



Distribution Reservoirs 
The locations, elevations and capacities of the distribution reservoirs of the 
Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following table : — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations 



Low Service: 

Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford .... 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston 

Weston Reservoir, Weston 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford 
Northern High Service: 

Fells Reservoir, Stoneham .... 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham . 
Northern Extra High Service: 

Arlington Reservoir, steel tank, Arlington 
Southern High Service: 

Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline 

Waban Hill Reservoir. Newton . 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy . 
Southern Extra High Service: 

Bellevue Reservoir, steel tank, West Roxbury district of Boston 

Total 



Elevation of 
High Water i 



163.00 
134.00 
200 . 00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.50 

251.00 
264 . 50 

192.00 
2.31.00 

375 . 00 



Capacity in 
Gallons 



1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

2,000,000 

15,500,000 

13,500,000 

5.100,000 

330,000 

2,500,000 



2,400,680,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 



P. D. 48 25 

By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the maintenance of its 
reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the Metropolitan Water Works, 
and the reservoir is used when necessary in connection with the northern high 
service supply. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons with high- 
water line at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was in service from January 2 to 
May 6, during the day time for several days in October to drain the water down 
to repair a crack in the concrete lining on the inside slope between the old concrete 
and the new concrete placed in 1904 and from November 22 to the end of the 
year. A chain link, non-climbable fence 6 feet in height and 515 feet in length 
was erected on the outer top edge of the reservoir embankment at a cost of $877, 
to prevent trespass on the reservoir. 

The city of Maiden standpipe on Waitt's Mount, which is under the care and 
control of the Division, has not been used during the year but has been kept full 
of water for use in case of emergency. Its capacity is 1,120,000 gallons with 
high-water line at elevation 250. 

The Mystic Reservoir was not in service during the year but was kept full for 
use in an emergency. The wooden steps at the southeasterly side of the reservoir 
were rebuilt and the stone steps near the gate-house were reset and repairs were 
made in the gate-house. Under an agreement with the officials of Tufts College, 
which adjoins the reservoir, two special police officers of the cities of Somerville 
and Medford, employed by the college, were appointed Special Metropolitan 
District Police, November 19, so that they could maintain order on the reservoir 
lands. 

The stone masonry of the dam at the outlet of Mystic Lake was repointed, the 
apron below the dam was repaired with large stones and concrete and the flooring 
over the stop-planks was repaired and painted; and some necessary repairs were 
made to the inlet gate-house of the Mystic conduit at Mystic Lake and to the 
outlet gate-house at Jerome Street. 

Arlington Reservoir was put in service again May 25, following the completion 
of the masonry tower. The grounds about the tower were graded and seeded and 
some shrubs were planted late in the year. The masonry tower was open to the 
public, under supervision of the Metropolitan Park Police, on Sundays and holi- 
days between 2 p.m. and sunset from September 21 to December 1. 

The woodwork and ironwork at the gate-houses at Spot Pond, Bear Hill and 
Fells reservoirs and the fence at Bear Hill Reservoir were painted. The gutters 
on Main Street along the beaches have been banked with loam to prevent overflow 
of surface water into Spot pond. 

Under the provisions of Acts of 1924, Chapter 240, loaded instead of blank 
cartridges were used to drive gulls and other birds from the waters of Spot Pond 
and Chestnut Hill reservoirs, beginning November 17. Although the firing was 
done with a view to frightening instead of killing the birds, one gull was killed at 
Spot Pond November 28, and one duck was killed at Chestnut Hill Reservoir on 
December 18. Better results than formerly are now being obtained in keeping 
the birds off of these waters. 

The Park Division has been paid $1,087.70 for police service at Spot Pond and 
$4,475.24 for police service at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

The Bradlee Basin of Chestnut Hill Reservoir was in service throughout the year 
and the Lawrence Basin from January 1 to February 6, from April 7 to August 16 
and from August 29 to October 6. 

The old wooden fence 845 feet in length along Beacon Street and the Parkway 
at the Lawrence Basin was replaced by a new fence with concrete posts and new 
iron pipe rails. 

At Fisher Hill Reservoir the stonewall along the westerly property line was 
rebuilt and the interior of the gate-house was cleaned and floor and gate stands 
were painted. 



26 P. D. 48 

The water in Forbes Hill Reservoir was drawn down to about elevation 190 for 
repairing concrete slopes where cracked, near the high-water line. The interior 
woodwork of the gate chamber and tower was painted and the stone steps on the 
reservoir embankment were repointed. 

At Bellevue Reservoir joints in the cap stones on the parapet wall were repointed 
and waterproof compound was applied to the joint between the roof and parapet 
wall, and some painting was done in the interior of the tower. 

The tower has been open to the public from 2 p.m. to sunset on Sundays and 
holidays throughout the year under the supervision of the Metropolitan Park 
Police. 

New stop-planks and screens were made for the terminal chamber at Weston 
Reservoir and some painting was done at the channel and terminal chambers. 
About 480 feet of wooden rail fence was rebuilt along the driveway between Loring 
Street and the terminal chamber. 

The grounds and structures at all of the distribution reservoirs have been given 
the necessary attention to keep them in good condition and the sluice gates and 
screens have been operated as required to maintain satisfactory service. 



Distribution Buildings and Grounds 

The repairs to the roofs of the gate-houses and pumping stations at the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir and the gate-house at the Waban Hill Reservoir, begun last year, 
have been completed. The roofs of the pumping station and gate-houses at Spot 
Pond have been repaired by replacing broken and cracked tiles, doing necessary 
work on gutters, conductor pipes and flashings, and replacing copper roof over the 
boiler room and coal bins with a composition roof. This work was done by con- 
tract at a cost of $2,320. The necessary carpentry and masonry work was done 
by the department force. 

Alterations have been made in the main building formerly used as a stable at 
the Glen wood pipe yard to fit it for use as a garage and locker and wash room, 
and minor repairs have been made to other parts of the building. 

Carpenter shop at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir was moved from the wooden 
building at the pipe yard to the masonry building located between the Chestnut 
Hill pumping stations, formerly used as a stable and now partly utilized for the 
machine shop. In connection with this change power operated wood-working 
machinery has been installed, materially increasing the amount of work accom- 
plished by the carpenter. 

The woodwork of the garage adjoining the old stable was painted. 



Distribution Pipe Lines 

About 300 feet of wire fencing was erected to enclose land between Loring Street 
and River Street, in Weston, in which the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains are 
located. 

The use of the Woodland pipe yard in Newton was terminated August 31. 

The meter register tank at the emergency connection with the city of Cambridge, 
at Cambridge Common, was removed on April 18 on account of the widening of 
Massachusetts Avenue which brought the tank into the street. 

Joint leaks in the 36-inch mains under the Mystic River at Wellington Bridge 
were examined by a diver on November 5. The largest leaks were found at the 
sleeves which were used in repairing the up-stream line which was accidentally 
broken in 1914 in connection with dredging operations in the river. A contract 
for repairing these leaks was made with George M. Bryne of Winchester, and work 
was begun December 16 but had not been completed at the end of the year. 

A 12-inch branch was installed in the 16-inch southern high-service Metropolitan 
Main in Common Street near Grenville Road in Watertown, July 1. A connec- 



P. D. 48 27 

tion was made with this branch by the Watertown water works officials on August 
28. This connection is provided for emergency service for the top of Meeting 
House Hill until additional pressure is permanently furnished for this section of 
the town. 

On December 31 the southerly of the two new 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Mains extending from the terminal chamber to the existing mains under the 
Charles River was put in service. 

Minor repairs were made to the pipe box supporting the 30-inch low-service 
main north of the tunnel under the channel at Chelsea North Bridge and to the 
pipe box at the Fox Hill Bridge over the Saugus River at the Lynn-Saugus boundary 
line. 

In connection with the rebuilding by the Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway 
of the trestle over the Pines River at the Revere-Saugus boundary line the pipe 
box was removed from our 16-inch supply main and temporary supports were 
installed until after the trestle was completed when the pipe was permanently 
supported on the new trestle and the pipe box was rebuilt. 

Only minor work has been required in connection with the other pipe bridges. 

There were 51 leaks discovered in the Metropolitan Mains during the year which 
were repaired at a total cost of $3,828.04. Of this number 13 were at defective 
wooden joints, the cost of repairing being $950.12. Of the remainder 32 were at 
lead joints in cast-iron mains and 6 were in the old kalamine pipe purchased from 
the town of Swampscott in 1909. 

There are now 72 Venturi meters from 6 to 60 inches in diameter in the distri- 
bution pipe lines. Sixty-two of these and 12 small disc, torrent and detector 
meters, 3 Union and 1 Crown meter owned by the town of Milton, and one detector 
meter owned by the city of Maiden, are regularly used for measuring the water 
supplied to the various cities and towns. 

The nine pressure regulating valves in the distribution mains, for reducing the 
pressure of the water supplied to Nahant, Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop and 
to portions of Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park have given satisfactory service. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 21 stations on the distribu- 
tion system and tables in the Appendix show the hydraulic grade at 18 of these 
stations as determined from the charts. 

A complete stock of pipes, specials and other materials and supplies required 
for maintaining and operating the pipe lines has been kept on hand at the Glen- 
wood pipe yard in Medford and at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard in Brighton, and 
an auto truck equipped with a gate-operating attachment has been stationed at 
each yard with men on duty ready to operate them in case of emergency any time 
during the day or night. 

Consumption of Water 

During the year 45,420,493,000 gallons of water were furnished from the Metro- 
politan Water Works to the 18 cities and towns supplied. This is equivalent to 
an average daily consumption of 124,099,700 gallons and for the estimated popu- 
lation of 1,300,000 is at the rate of 95 gallons per capita per day, a decrease of 
2 gallons per capita since 1923. While business conditions tended to reduce the 
quantity of water used for business purposes, the dry summer and fall tended to 
increase the use of water for lawn sprinkling and agricultural purposes. Under 
the circumstances a reduction of 2 gallons per capita per day in the total con- 
sumption is probably due to the further installation of meters on service pipes and 
other measures taken in some places to reduce waste. 

The population, consumption of water and per cent of services metered in the 
Metropolitan Water District as supplied in 1924, and for the period from 1890 to 
1924, inclusive, are shown graphically by the accompanying diagram. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the municipalities in the 
Metropolitan Water District supplied during 1923 and 1924 as measured by the 
Metropolitan W T ater Works meters is as follows : — 



28 
















P. D. 48 




Estimated 


Average Daily Consumption. 




1923 


1924 






Popula- 










Decrease 














tion, 1924 




Gallons 




Gallons 


in 






Gallons 


per Capita 


Gallons 


per Capita 


Gallons 


Arlington 


23,600 


1,251,100 


58 


1,395,000 


59 


143,9001 


Belmont 






13,850 


865,700 


66 


887,200 


64 


21,500i 


Boston . 






787,620 


88,932,800 


113 


87,680,900 


111 


1,251,900 


Chelsea 






46,600 


3,646,100 


80 


3,551,700 


76 


94,400 


Everett 






44,100 


4,309,200 


100 


4,491,500 


102 


182,3001 


Lexington 






6,990 


440,700 


64 


448,000 


64 


7,300i 


Maiden . 






53,350 


2,857,100 


55 


2,859,900 


54 


2,8001 


Medford 






46,150 


2,563,400 


58 


2,441,400 


53 


122,000 


Melrose 






19,390 


1,268,400 


66 


1,247,400 


64 


21,000 


Milton . 






11,450 


452,500 


41 


537,000 


47 


84,5001 


Nahant 






1,550 


189,900 


127 


195,800 


126 


5,900i 


Quincy . 






53,260 


4,175,700 


80 


4,352,400 


82 


176,7001 


Revere . 






31,000 


2,255,800 


75 


2,293,300 


74 


37,5001 


Somerville 






100,660 


8,008,500 


81 


7,760,100 


77 


248,400 


Stoneham 






8,230 


615,200 


75 


600,900 


73 


14,300 


Swampscott 






8,400 


658,500 


79 


731,100 


87 


72,6001 


Watertown 






26,100 


1,804,300 


72 


1,657,100 


63 


147,200 


Winthrop 






17,700 


950,100 


55 


969,000 


55 


18,9001 


District 






1,300,000 


125,245,000 


97 


124,099,700 


95 


1,145,300 



1 Increase. 

The consumption by districts in 1924 as compared with 1923 is as follows : — 





Gallons 

per Dav, 

1924' 


Decrease from 1923 




Gallons Percent- 
per Day age 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service dis- 
trict of Boston with the exception of Charlestown and 
East Boston 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service dis- 
tricts of Arlington, Charlestown, Chelsea, East Boston, 
Everett, Maiden, Medford and Somerville .... 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Water- 
town, the high-service districts of Boston and portions of 
Belmont and Milton . 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Nahant, 
Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott and Winthrop and the 
high-service districts of Chelsea, East Boston, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford and Somerville 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher 
portions of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury . 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington 
and the higher portions of Arlington and Belmont 


41,179,800 
27,809,100 
42,173,500 

10,787,000 
1,007,700 
1,142,600 


405,500 
824,900 
380,900 

379,000! 
12,1001 
74,900! 


.98 

2.88 

.90 

3.641 
1.221 
7.021 


Totals 


124,099,700 


1,145,300 


.91 



i Increase. 

During June, July, August, October, November and December 98,762,000 
gallons of water was furnished to the city of Newton, through the emergency con- 
nection on Ward Street near Hammond Street, or 85,262,000 gallons in excess of 
the quantity the city is entitled to take free of charge under the agreement made 
in 1900 when the Waban Hill Reservoir was purchased from the city. It was at 
first arranged that the city should replace this water with an equal quantity from 
its works but by later agreement the city will pay the sum of $5,001.47 for the 
water obtained from the Metropolitan Water Works in excess of the capacity of 
the Waban Hill Reservoir. 



Installation of Meters on Service Pipes 
Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes by the munici- 
palities supplied with water from the Metropolitan Water Works is given in the 
accompanying table. 



POPULATION , CONSUMPTION OF WATER and PER CENT OF SERVICES METERED 

IN THE «-r\.UL/ 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1924 

FROM 1890 TO 1924 
















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1920 1922 



1924 



Note : Estimated population and consumption per capita given on diagram published in annual reports 1916 to 1919 
inclusive have been revised and are here shown in accordance with 1920 census. 



P.D. 



29 



Per 

Cent of 
Services 
metered 
Dec. 31, 
1924 


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Dec. 31, 

1924 


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Dec. 31, 

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Dec. 31, 

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Dec. 31, 

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Number 
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1908-1924, 

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Old 
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Dec. 31, 

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Dec. 31, 

1907 


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1907 


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Lexington 

Maiden 

Medford 

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Quincy 

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Somerville 

Stoneham 

Swampscott 

Watertown 

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30 P. D. 48 

Water Supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District 
During the year 812,571,615 gallons of water were supplied from the Metropoli- 
tan Water Works for use outside the Metropolitan Water District, for which 
$23,589.40 was charged, as follows : — 





Number of 










Days on 


Total 


Average 




Places Supplied 


which Water 


Quantity 


Quantity 


Amount 




was 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons 


Charged 




Supplied 




per Day) 




City of Worcester 


52 


240,200,000 




$9,608 00 


Westborough State Hospital .... 


366 


71,722,000 


196,000 


2,151 66 


Town of Framingham: 










From Sudbury Aqueduct prior to Novem- 










ber 9 


313 


260,531,885 


I 


6,252 77 


From filter-gallery at Farm Pond . 


313 


128,902,918 


\ 1,242,942 


246 54 


From Sudbury Aqueduct after November 9 


53 


65,481,812 


J ' 


2,619 27 


Portion of Town of Saugus 


321 


27,646,000 




1,550 00 


United States Government: 










Peddock's Island 




18,087,000 


— 


1,161 16 



Filtration of Water 
The experiments begun in 1923 to obtain information concerning the improve- 
ment by filtration of the portion of the water supply not now used for consump- 
tion because of its objectionable color have been continued so as to cover all con- 
ditions that arise during the entire year. General plans and estimates are now 
being prepared for filtration works for the waters of the 47 square miles on the 
South Sudbury Watershed which have not been used for water supply since 1912. 
The total expenditure from the $25,000 appropriation for this work to January 1, 
1925 is $14,180.37 leaving $10,819.63 available for completion of the work. 

Water Works Statistics 

Statistics relating to the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works for the 
year 1924 are given in tables in the Appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM E. FOSS, Director and Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 2, 1925. 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR AND CHIEF 
OF SEWERAGE DIVISION 



ENGINEER 



Davis B. Keniston, Commissioner, Metropolitan District Commission. 

Dear Sir: — The following report of the operations of the Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Works for the year ending December 31, 1924, is respectfully submitted: — 

Organization 

The Director and Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works controlled 
by the Metropolitan District Commission for removing sewage from the twenty- 
six municipalities which comprise the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year: — 

Henry T. Stiff, Senior Assistant Engineer, in charge of office and drafting room 
and of construction work. 

Charles F. Fitz, Assistant Engineer, in charge of maintenance studies and 
records. 

Ralph W. Loud, Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey work and field work 
in connection with the New Mystic Sewer and Mill Brook Valley Sewer con- 
struction. 



P. D. 48 31 

George W. Wood, Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey for sewer location in 
Mill Brook Valley, Arlington. 

Thomas L. Whelan, Superintendent, North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, Superintendent, South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

In addition to the above, the maximum number of engineering and other assist- 
ants employed during the year was 14, which includes 2 instrumentmen, 3 inspec- 
tors, 2 draftsmen, 5 rodmen and engineering assistants and 2 stenographers. 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS 

Areas and Populations 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Districts. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, are based on 
the census of 1920. 

Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations within 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of , December 31, 192Iy. 



City or Town 


Area (Square 


Estimated 




Miles) 


Population 




Arlington 


5.20 


24,050 




Belmont . 










4.66 


14,050 




Boston (portions oi 


) 








3.45 


99,350 




Cambridge 










6.11 


114,650 


d 


Chelsea . 










2.24 


46,800 


4-> 


Everett . 










3.34 


44,300 


o 


Lexington 1 










5.11 


5,370 




Maiden . 










5.07 


53,680 




Medford . 










8.35 


46,820 


as 


Melrose . 










3.73 


19,550 


Reading . 










9.82 


8,050 




Revere 










5.86 


31,500 


o 


Somerville 










3.96 


100,830 


Stoneham 










5.50 


8,260 




Wakefield 










7.65 


14,110 




Winchester 










5.95 


11,240 




Winthrop 










1.61 


17,950 




W T oburn . 










12.71 


17,250 










inn q. a 


ftr/iy ft! A 




1UU . o% 


Dl I ,OlU 


c3 


Boston (portions of) 








24.96 


296,130 


-t-s 


Brookline 








6.81 


41,680 


Q 


Dedham 1 












9.40 


11,810 


o "8 


Milton . 












12.59 


11,620 


-3 f-i 


Newton . 












16.88 


49,110 


is 


Quincy . 












12.56 


53,880 


3' 


Waltham 












13.63 


33,030 




Water town 












4.04 


26,650 


C/2 


^ Wellesley 












9.89 


7,210 




110 7fi 


koi iun 




11U . I o 


Do 1,1 XU 




Totals 












211.08 


1,208,930 



iPart of Town. 



32 



P. D. 48 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS 



Sewers Purchased and Constructed and Their Connections 
During the year there have been 1.233 miles of Metropolitan sewers built within 
the sewerage districts, so that there are now 120.370 miles of Metropolitan sewers. 
Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, with the Quincy Pumping Station, have been 
purchased from cities and towns of the districts. The remaining 110.728 miles of 
sewers and other works have been constructed by the Metropolitan Boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the following tables, 
together with other data referring to the public and special connections with the 
systems : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage system 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 









o £-* 


Special Connections 










d - w 










,§■ 


c £2 






City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


a 


8*j 




a c 
•- o 






+5 


2 o ■ 


Character or Location of 


i <s 






M 
C 
QJ 


7!.2 S 


Connection 


g& 






h-1 


fc 




£° 


Boston: — 












Deer Island . 


4'0"to9'0" . .' . 


1.653 


4 

[ 


Shoe factory .... 


1 


East Boston . 


9'0" to V 0" ... 


5.467 


25 i 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 
Co 


1 


Charlestown . 


6'7"X7'5" to l'O" . 


3.292 


,j 


Navy Yard .... 
Private building 


9 
1 








Club House .... 


1 


Winthrop . 


9'0" . ■ . 


?, 864 


14' 


Fire department station 
Private building 

Bakery 

Rendering works . 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
1 
1 
1 


Chelsea 


8'4"X9'2" to 15" 


5.230 


14. 


blow-off .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
offs 

Naval Hospital 

U. S. Lighthouse Service 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off .... 

Cameron Appliance Co. 

Shultz-Goodwin Co. 


1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


Everett 


8'2"X8' 10" to 4'8"X5'1" 


2 . 925 


8. 


Andrews-Wasgatt Co. . 
National Metallic Bed Co. . 

Linoide Co 

Factorv 

New England Structural Co. 


1 
1 
1 
2 

1 


Lexington . 


_ _ 


- 


1 { 


Metropolitan Water Works 


— 


Maiden 


4'6"X4' 10" to l'O" . 


5.844 1 


35' 


blow-off .... 
Private buildings . 
Private buildings . 


1 
2192 
1284 


Melrose 


4' 6" X 4' 10" to 10" . 


6.099 3 


39- 


Factory 

Railroad station 

Park Department bath-house 

Harvard dormitories 

Slaughter house 

City Hospital 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 


Cambridge . 


5'2"X5'9" to 1'3" . 


7.209 


48- 


Street railway machine shop 
Private building 
Factory building . 


1 
1 
1 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with sewers formerly belonging to city of Maiden but later purchased 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 215 of the Acts of 1S98 and by 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in accordance with Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1911 and 
made parts of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

3 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

4 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the city of Melrose but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1S96 
and with a sewer extension built in accordance with Chapter 436 of the Acts of 1897 by the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commission as an outlet for part of the town of Stoneham and made parts of the North Metro- 
politan Sewerage System. 



P. D. 48 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 



33 



-Con. 









? k-* 


Special Connections 








k-l 


c £§> 












C Jh 






City ok Town 


Size of Sewers 


a 






a a 
— o 






-u 


.2 c ►; 


Character or Location of 


% a 






G 
o 


3.2 w 


Connection 


as 






ij 


c^ 




£° 








[ 


Tannery 


i 










Slaughterhouses (3) 


i 










Carhouse .... 


i 










Somerville Water Works 




Somerville . 


6' 5" X 7' 2" to 10" 


3.577 


13- 

> 


blow-off .... 
Street railway power house 
Stable . . 
Rendering works . 
Railroad scale pit . 
Private building 
Armory building . 


i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 


Medford 


4'8"X5' 1" to 10' 


6.000 


26" 


Private buildings . 

Stable 

Police substation . 
Tanneries .... 
Private buildings . 
Gelatine factory 
Watch-hand factory 
Stable 


9 
1 
1 
6 

10 
1 
1 
1 


Winchester 


4' 6" to 1' 3' . 


10.420 


28- 


Railroad station 
Felt works .... 
Town Hall .... 
Bay State Saw & Tool Co. . 
Whitney Machine Co. . 
Metropolitan Sewerage Di- 
vision 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


Stoneham . 


V 8" to 10" .... 


2.333 


4 l 


Glue factory .... 


4 


Wo burn 


2' 6" X 2' 7" to V 3" . 


1.186 


3 { 


Private buildings . 
Private buildings . 


1 
1762 


Arlington . 


1' 6" to 10" .... 


3.520 1 


50 


Railroad station 

Car house .... 

Post office .... 


1 
3 

1 


Belmont 3 


- - 


- 


3 


— - 


- 


Wakefield . 


3' 0"to2'0"X2'3" . 


0.703 


1 


- - 


- 


Revere 


4' 0" to 15" .... 


0.136 


3 


— — 


— 


Reading 




0.055 


1 




- 




68.513 4 


335 


615 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 Mostly buildings connected with a sewer formerly belonging to the town of Arlington but later pur- 
chased by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission in accordance with Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 
and made a part of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

3 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Belmont. 

4 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley Sewer in Medford and Winchester, running parallel with the 
Metropolitan Sewer. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 





Size of Sewers 


02 
CD 

.5 

C 
o 
h3 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decem- 
ber 31, 1924 


Special Connections 


City or Town 


Character or Location of 
Connection 


•~ o 

Si •- 

I 


Boston: — 
Back Bay 

Brighton 


6' 6" to 3' 9" 
5'9"X6'0" to 12" 


1.500 1 
6.010 2 


16- 


Tufts Medical School . 
Private house 
Administration Building, 

Boston Park Department 
Simmons College Buildings . 
Art Museum .... 
Prince District Elementary 

School .... 
Private buildings . 
Abattoir 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 
3 



2 5 lc \ u ^. es - 355 of a mil9 of sewer purchased from the city of Boston 
Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
oi a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



34 P. D. 48 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections- 



on. 







m 

a. 




Special Connections 








1 


a toe* 
a £2 






City or Town 


Size of Sewers 


a 


6Q.- 




.a o 






-u 


•hS^ 


Character or Location of 


£'"§ 






60 

0) 


3-2 9 

3+2 J2 


Connection 


J2 Ph 

S3 <U 

5 o. 






h-1 


Ah 




I 










Chocolate works . 


2 








. 


Machine shop 


1 


Dorchester . . 


3'X4'to2'6"X2'7" . 


2.8701 


13 


Paper Mill .... 
Private buildings . 
Edison Electric Company 
Station .... 
Mattapan Paper Mills 


1 
3 

1 
2 


Hyde Park 


10' 7"X 11' 7" to 4' 0"X4' 1" 


4.527 


18 


Private buildings . 
k Fairview Cemetery buildings 


2 

1 


Roxbury . 


6'6"X7' to4'0" . '. 


1.430 




Caledonia Grove buildings . 


1 


West Roxbury 


9' 3" X 10' 2" to 12" . 


7.643 


17 


Parental School 

Lutheran Evangelical Church 

Private buildings . 


1 
1 










6 


Brookline . 


6' 6" X 7' 0" to 8" 


2.540 2 


12 


Private buildings . 


2 


Dedham 


4'X4' 1" to 2'9"X3' . 


5.012 


8 


Private buildings . 
1 Dedham Carpet Mills . 


1 
1 


Hull 3 . 


60" pipe .... 


0.750 


— 


— - 


- 


Milton 


H'Xl2'to8" 


3.600 


24 


Private buildings . 


2 


Newton 


4' 2" X 4' 9" to 1' 3" . 


2.911 


8 


Private houses 
Metropolitan Water Works 


7 


Quincy 


11' 3" X 12' 6" to 24" pipe . 


7.392 


17 


blow-off .... 
Squantum schoolhouse 


1 
1 


Waltham 


3'6"X4'0" .... 


001 


1 


Factories .... 


2 


Watertown 


4' 2" X 4' 9" to 12" 


0.750 4 


7 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co. 
Knights of Pythias building 


1 
1 


Needham 3 . 


2'0"X2'3" to 2'3"X2'6". 


4.921 


— 


Walker-Gordon Co. 


1 


Wellesley 5 . 




- 


1 


- 


- 




51.857 


157 




53 



1 Includes 1 . 24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

3 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

4 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

5 The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 

Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections and other 
data for the Metropolitan sewerage districts appears in the following table : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District 



Area 
(Square 
Miles) 



100.32 



110.76 



211.08 



Estimated 

Total 
Population 



Miles of 

Local Sewer 

Connected 



Estimated 

Population 

Contributing 

Sewage 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per cent) 



677,810 839.59 630,310 

South Metropolitan Sewerage District 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers 



Public Special 



335 615 



531,120 



78.8 



741.63 418,710 

Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts 

1 ,208,930 1 ,581 . 22 1 ,049,020 



157 



53 



492 668 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,208, 930 on December 31, 1924, 1,049,020 
representing 86.8 per cent, were on that date contributing sewage to the Metro- 
politan sewers, through a total length of 1,581.22 miles of local sewers owned by 
the individual cities and towns of the districts. 



P. D. 48 35 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan Systems by 492 public and 
668 special connections. During the current year there has been an increase of 
32.06 miles of local sewers connected with the Metropolitan Systems, and 7 public 
and 12 special connections have been added. 

CONSTRUCTION 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

New Mystic Sewer 

The construction in the North Metropolitan Sewerage District, authorized by 
Chapter 529 of the Acts of 1922, was completed during this year. The work was 
divided into two sections, 71 and 72 of the New Mystic Sewer. A contract for the 
construction of Section 71 was described in last year's report. The contract for 
Section 72 was awarded to Antony Cefalo, some particulars of which are as 
follows : — 

Date of contract No. 16 (Sewerage Division), January 17, 1924. 

Name of contractor, Antony Cefalo. 

Length of section, 3,476 linear feet. 

Average depth of sewer in trench, 10 feet, 6 inches. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 30 inches by 31 inches. 

Length of concrete sewer, 2,359 linear feet. 

Diameter of pipe sewer, 20 inches. 

Length of pipe sewer, 1,117 linear feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

Work was started on this section January 21, 1924, and was carried on to com- 
pletion on August 4, 1924. At Station 23 + 59 was built a special controlling 
structure in which was left an opening for the sewer which has been projected for 
the Aberjona River Valley in the city of Woburn. The work authorized by the 
above chapter, together with the previously existing sewer line, will furnish ample 
sewerage accommodations for this district for many years. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer, Arlington 

Chapter 65, Resolves of 1923, authorized a survey and study for a sewer in 
Mill Brook Valley, Arlington, in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 
520, Acts of 1897. Chapter 116, Acts of 1924, authorized the construction of 
this work. This sewer will extend from West Medford at Warren Street through 
public streets and private lands to Forest Street in Arlington. It will be divided 
into four sections. The lower section, numbered 77, extends from Warren Street, 
West Medford, through High Street, to near the Mystic River. A contract for 
this section was awarded to Anthony Baruffaldi Company, some particulars of 
which are as follows: — 

Date of contract No. 18 (Sewerage Division), July 3, 1924. 

Name of contractor, Anthony Baruffaldi Co. 

Length of section, 3,100 linear feet. 

Maximum depth of excavation in trench, 26 feet. 

Average depth of excavation in trench, 17 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 36 inches by 42 inches. 

Length of concrete sewer, 2,573 linear feet. 

Dimensions of cast-iron pipe sewer, 2 lines of 30-inch pipe. 

Length of cast-iron pipe sewer, 527 linear feet. 

Length of local 8-inch sewer built to accommodate dwellings on north side of 

High Street, 570 linear feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Ralph W. Loud. 

Work was begun on this section July 23, 1924, and has been continued at two 
openings. At the present time, 1,020 feet of 36-inch by 42-inch sewer and 527 
feet of double line of 30-inch cast-iron pipe and 480 feet of 8-inch local sewer have 
been constructed. The nature of the ground at the lower end of this section is such 
that it has been necessary to use 3-inch matched sheeting driven about 5 feet 
below the underdrain. By so doing, it has been possible to construct this sewer 
without serious difficulty from the very fine sand encountered. At Station 25 -f- 20 
the structure passes the old Mystic water supply conduit which conducted water 



36 P. D. 48 

from upper Mystic Lake to the Mystic Pumping Station. It was necessary 
to reduce the cross-section of the conduit at this point. The shallow depth from 
Station 22 + 20 to Station 27 -f- 60 necessitated the construction of a local 8-inch 
sewer to accommodate the dwellings whose drainage had been cut off by the 
construction of the main sewer. This discharges into a manhole in the local 
Medford Sewer opposite Station 27 + 70. 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer, Section 78 
Plans and specifications for the construction of this section are nearly completed. 
It is expected that this section will be placed under contract early in the season. 

MAINTENANCE 

SCOPE OF WORK AND FORCE EMPLOYED 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes the operating 
of 8 pumping stations, the Nut Island Screen-house and 120.371 miles of Metro- 
politan sewers, receiving the discharge from 1,581.22 miles of town and city sewers 
at 492 points, together with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams 
and in the harbor. 

At present the permanent maintenance force consists of 173 men, of whom 106 
are employed on the North System and 67 on the South System. These are sub- 
divided as follows : North Metropolitan System, 67 engineers and other employees 
in the pumping stations and 39 men, including foremen, on maintenance, care of 
sewer lines, buildings and grounds: South Metropolitan System, 41 engineers and 
other employees in the pumping stations and 26 men, including foremen, on 
maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation of the pump- 
ing stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning and inspecting sewers and 
siphons, caring for tide gates, outfall sewers, regulators and overflows, measuring 
flow in sewers, inspection of connections to the Metropolitan sewers, and the care 
of pumping stations and other buildings, grounds and wharves. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by the maintenance 
employees in this department as follows : — 

Deer Island Pumping Station 

Attention has been called in previous reports to the condition of the wharf at 
Deer Island. No appropriation has been allowed for the erection of a new wharf. 
Either extensive repairs must be made or a new wharf constructed. This wharf 
is in an unsafe condition and the coal run is barely usable. 

Pumping Unit No. 3 at this station has been extensively repaired. These 
repairs consist of a cast-iron segment ring which has been placed inside of the 
pump casing and secured thereto by bolts. This was done to take up the wear 
between the impeller wheel and the casing. A new bronze sleeve was put on the 
10-inch shaft and a steady bearing was placed immediately above the pump casing. 
This bearing became necessary because of the weakening of the quarter box bearing 
due to corrosion. A new 48-inch check valve disc was placed in the discharge 
pipe of this pump. 

East Boston Pumping Station 

Pumping engine No. 3 at this station was repaired similarly to the one at 
Deer Island, mentioned in the preceding paragraph. A new piston and piston 
rod fitted with Tripp metallic packing was installed in the high pressure cylinder 
of this unit. 

The lot owned by the Commonwealth situated on the Chelsea side of Chelsea 
Creek was enclosed by a woven Toncan iron fence six feet in height. This was 
erected by C. A. Gates & Company. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

The No. 3 engine at this station received extensive repairs. These consisted of 
a cast-iron segment ring placed inside of the casing at the lower side of the impeller 
wheel. This was secured by bolts to the casing and was put in to replace the 



P. D. 48 37 

wear and corrosion which had taken place. A new steady bearing was installed 
above the pump case together with a new bronze sleeve on the 10-inch shaft. 
The 48-inch check valve disc in the discharge pipe of No. 3 pump broke in service 
and was renewed. 

Pump Unit No. 2 also received extensive repairs. These consisted of the 
installation of a new impeller wheel and repairs to the casing. A new steady 
bearing was installed above the pump casing together with a new bronze sleeve 
on the 6-inch shaft. All the repairs on pump No. 2 were completed so that it 
was put in service on November 14, 1924. 

The 8-inch salt water exhaust pipe from the condensers of pumping units No. 1 
and No. 2 had been in place since the station was built in 1894. It had become 
so badly corroded that it was necessary to renew a part of it. 

The work of renewing the screen guides, as mentioned in last year's report, has 
been completed and new screens have been installed. 

The fender piling and caplog at the easterly side of the station had become so 
badly rotted it was necessary to renew the structure. This was done by the 
William L. Miller Company. 

Winchester Stock Yard 
During the year a new locker building constructed of concrete blocks, with 
asphalt shingled roof, having a length of 115 feet and a width of 27 feet has been 
constructed. This building contains an office, men's room and lockers, repair 
shop, garage and two storage rooms. It is heated by a low-pressure steam boiler 
and contains toilets. 

Ward Street Pumping Station 

At the time of the construction of the Ward Street Sewerage Pumping Station, 
it was designed that a third pump of the triple-expansion plunger type should be 
at some time added to the pumping plant. The station was originally put into 
service in 1904. Since that time the design of centrifugal pumps has been so 
improved that it has been considered best to substitute one of this type for the 
plunger pump originally intended. Foundation was placed at the time of the 
construction of the building to receive the plunger pump. It has been possible, 
however, to adapt the new type of pump to the existing foundation. 

The cost of the centrifugal unit as compared with the plunger type unit is at 
present probably in the ratio of about 1 to 6. Not only has this saving in capital 
been effected but the upkeep of this type of pump is very small as compared with 
the plunger type and the difference in overall maintained efficiency will not be 
great. 

Early in the year a 50,000,000 gallon pumping unit was received at this station. 
This consists of a 540 HP. uniflow engine built by the Nordberg Company and 
a centrifugal pump built by the Morris Pump Works. This engine and pump 
with condenser and appurtenances were ordered through the firm of Starkweather 
& Broadhurst of Boston to be delivered but not erected. The placing of foun- 
dation and erection of the pump together with the designing and installing of 
piping and other accessory appliances have all been performed by the mainten- 
ance force. Sewage will be used for condensing purposes which will be accom- 
plished by a Schutte-Koerting eductor condenser. At the present time the engine, 
primary heater and condenser pump, discharge pipe, suction pipe, steam pipe 
and most of the auxiliary piping are in position. 

Some particulars of this engine and pump are as follows: — 

Engine 
Total weight, 130,000 pounds. 
Maximum revolutions per minute, 150. 
Diameter of main shaft, 16 inches. 
Horse Power, 540. 

Guaranteed steam per HP. hour, 13.9 lbs. 
Diameter of cylinder, 24 inches. 
Diameter of piston rod, 6| inches. 
Stroke, 40 inches. 



38 P. D. 48 

Diameter of fly wheel, 12 feet. 

Weight of fly wheel, 35,000 lbs. 

Guaranteed duty on steam basis, 103,000,000. 

Pump 
Total weight: 70,000 pounds. 
Diameter of impeller wheel, 92 inches. 
Diameter of suction, 40 inches. 
Diameter of discharge, 36 inches. 
Diameter of shaft, 10 \ inches. 
Lift of suction of pump, 14 feet. 
Total dynamic head, 45 feet. 

This engine is protected from back water by a Schutte-Koerting steam operated, 
butterfly valve and by a Morton Vacuum Breaker and Water Check Valve. A 
Reilly primary heater has been installed in the exhaust line. The unit may be 
operated non-condensing, if necessary. It is expected that this engine will be 
put into operation early in the coming year. 

A Sturtevant economizer was installed at this station to replace the Green 
economizer which had been in use since 1904. 

Nut Island Screen-house 

In addition to the regular service at this station during the year, 4,483 pounds 
of bronze castings have been made here for use in the several pumping stations. 

The copper gutter on this station originally consisted of 16-ounce material. 
This had been on twenty years and was so badly corroded it was no longer possible 
to keep it tight. A new gutter has been constructed consisting of 24-ounce copper. 
Work was done by a firm of roofers in conjunction with our own force. 

The mechanic in charge of this station has been employed during most of the 
year in supervising the erection of the new 50,000,000 gallon pumping unit at 
Ward Street Pumping Station. 

A fence around the yard at Prospect Street, Hough's Neck, has been erected 
consisting of woven Toncan iron having a height of five feet. This was erected 
by C. A. Gates & Company. 

The building and stable at the stock yard at Prospect Street were repainted. 

A new 40 horsepower Lathrop engine was installed in the boat used for harbor 
work. 

Gasolene in Public Sewers 

During the year the usual precautions have been maintained against the intro- 
duction of gasolene into the Metropolitan Sewers. An inspector has been em- 
ployed who covers both North and South Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. His 
duties are to see that all newly constructed garages or other gasolene using estab- 
lishments are supplied with a proper gasolene separator and also to see that these 
separators are kept in working condition. 

During the year 1924 a larger number of permits for garages and places where 
gasolene is used was issued than in any previous year, namely, 2,458. Each of 
these permits necessitates an examination by our inspector. Many of them, 
however, are attended to through the mails and do not require a personal visit. 
Visits are made, however, to all locations where a connection is to be made with 
the public sewer system and to such places as do not respond to the return postal 
cards sent out. During the year 85 such places were connected with the sewers 
that empty into the Metropolitan Systems. At the present time, there are, 
according to our records, 1,270 garages and other establishments where gasolene 
is used connected with the Sewerage Systems which discharge into the Metro- 
politan sewers. 

This system of inspection has given satisfactory results. Occasionally odors of 
gasolene are detected in the sewers but the amount is not sufficient to be dangerous 
and the situation appears to be well in hand. 



P. D. 48 



39 



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42 P. D. 48 

PUMPING STATIONS 

Capacities and Results 

North Metropolitan System 

Deer Island Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with impeller wheels 8.25 
feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 54,100,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 74,900,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 126,600,000 gallons. 

East Boston Pumping Station 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with impeller wheels 
8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss 
type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 70,700,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 72,900,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 124,600,000 gallons. 

Charlestown Pumping Station 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of them having 
impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 feet in diameter. They are 
driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 46,400,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 41,600,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 67,700,000 gallons. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 

The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrews commercial centrifugal 
pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to compound marine engines, together 
with a pump and engine added later. The latter consists of a specially designed 
engine of the vertical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a centrif- 
ugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 19,400,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 5,560,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 13,400,000 gallons. 

Reading Pumping Station 

At this station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, of 2,500,000 gallons per 
24 hours, and 4,000,000 gallons per 24 hours, capacity. These operate against a 
maximum head of 65 feet, and are actuated by vertical shafts directly connected 
with 75 and 100 horsepower motors. Alternating current of 440 volts furnished 
by the municipal plant of the town of Reading is used. 

Average quantity pumped per 24 hours: 740,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 980,000 gallons. 



P. D. 48 43 

South Metropolitan System 

Ward Street Pumping Station 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, of the Allis- 

Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the plungers of which are 48 inches 

in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. A 50,000,000 gallon centrifugal pumping 

unit is being installed. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps : 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 69,900,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 34,200,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 66,100,000 gallons. 

Quincy Pumping Station 
The plant at this station consists of one compound condensing Deane duplex 
piston pumping unit and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine and one Morris centrifugal pump driven by a Morris 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Morris centrifugal 10,000,000 gallons; Deane, 

5,000,000 gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 
Average duty for the year: 24,000,000 foot pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 5,029,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 11,500,000 gallons. 

Nut Island Screen-house 
The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate actuated by 
small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two vertical Deane boilers, 80 
horsepower each, operate the engines, provide heat and light for the house, burn 
materials intercepted at the screens, and furnish power for the Quincy (Hough's 
Neck) sewage lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens: 60,875,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity passing screens per day: 182,000,000 gallons. 

Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station 
At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal pumps with 

vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from the Nut Island 

Screen-house, and as used at present it does not material^ increase the amount 

of coal used at the latter station. 

Average quantity raised each day: 214,000 gallons. 
Maximum quantity raised per day: 472,300 gallons. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Seven Principal Metropolitan 
Sewerage Pumping Stations and at the Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting 
Station during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the 
Previous Year. 



Pumping Station 



Deer Island 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Alewife Brook 

Reading 

Quincy 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped) . 
Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting station 



Average Daily Pumpage 



Jan. 1, 1924, 

to Dec. 31, 

1924 


Jan. 1, 1923, 

to Dec. 31, 

1923 


Increase during the 
Year 


Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 


Per Cent 


74,900,000 


76,200,000 


1,300,0001 


1.71 


72,900,000 


74,200,000 


1,300,0001 


1.8i 


41,600,000 


41,800,000 


200,0001 


0.5i 


5,560,000 


5,440,000 


120,000 


2.2 


740,000 


750,000 


10,0001 


1.3i 


5,029,000 


4,990,000 


39,000 


0.8 


34,200,000 


34,100,000 


100,000 


0.3 


214,000 


218,000 


4,0001 


1.8i 



Decrease. 



44 



P. D. 48 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 



The Metropolitan Sewerage Districts now have outfalls in Boston Harbor at 
five points, two of which may discharge sewage from the North District and three 
from the South District. 

During the year the sewage of the North District has been discharged wholly 
through the outlet located near Deer Island light. The other outfall of this 
system is closed by a cast-iron cover which can easily be removed. 

Of the outfalls of the South District two extend for a distance exceeding one 
mile from the shore of Nut Island, Quincy, and the third one, called an emergency 
outlet, extends about 1,500 feet from the same. No discharge was made through 
the emergency outlet during 1924. 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan District 
outfall at Deer Island has been 74,875,000 gallons of sewage per 24 hours, with a 
maximum rate of 126,600,000 gallons during a stormy period in August, 1924. 
The amount of sewage discharged in the North Metropolitan District averaged 119 
gallons per day for each person, taking the estimated population of the District 
contributing sewage. If the sewers in this district were restricted to the admission 
of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 60,875,000 gallons of sewage 
per 24 hours has passed through the screens at the Nut Island Screen-house, and 
has been discharged from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The maximum rate 
of discharge per day which occurred during a stormy period in August, 1924, was 
182,000,000 gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed by the South Metropolitan District, which was 
at the rate of 145 gallons per day per person of the estimated number contributing 
sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in the South 
Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan District, because, 
owing to the large size and unused capacity of the South District High-level 
Sewer, more storm water is at present admitted to the sewers of this District. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage Stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating materials, has during 
the year amounted to 1,540.5 cubic yards. This is equivalent to 1.52 cubic feet 
for each million gallons of sewage pumped at Deer Island. 

The material removed from the sewage at the screens of the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage Stations has amounted to 3,462.6 cubic yards, equal to 4.19 cubic feet 
per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan Sewers and siphons indicate that 
they are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 
Boston, January 1, 1925. Director and Chief Engineer of Sewerage Division. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

PARKS DIVISION 





Total of 


Expended for 


Total 






Loan Funds 


Loans and 


Year ending 


Expended to 


Balance 




Receipts 


Jan. 1, 1925 


Jan. 1, 1925 




Metropolitan Parks Loan 


$9,291,986 77 




$9,262,649 


13 


$29,337 64 


Metropolitan Parks Loan II — 












General 


6,595,579 54 


$348 40 


6,502,936 


43 


92,643 11 


Neponset Bridge Loan 


900,020 00 


221,440 54 


876,140 


78 


23,879 22 


Old Colony Boulevard 


1,753,334 62 


253,947 37 


309,785 


74 


1,443,548 88 


Furnace Brook Parkway . 


135,000 00 


102,282 13 


102, (US 


58 


32,381 42 


Cottage Farm Bridge Loan 


1,100,000 00 


9,838 91 


101,641 


03 


998,358 97 


Western Ave. Bridge Loan 


275,000 00 


216,547 73 


217,263 


84 


57,736 16 


Arsenal St. Bridge Loan . 


175,000 00 


4,690 51 


5,396 


99 


169,603 01 


River St. Bridge Loan 


275,000 00 


10,909 27 


11,134 


77 


263,865 23 


Mass. Ave. Bridge Loan . 


600,000 00 


355,920 95 


355,920 


95 


244,079 05 


No. Traffic Route Loan . 


1,800,000 00 


5,723 56 


5,723 


56 


1,794,276 44 


Charles River Basin Loan 


4,509,368 91 


60 00 


4,472,862 


22 


36,506 69 



P. D. 48 45 

Maintenance Expenditures, January 1, 1924 to January 1, 1925 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, General: Totals 

General Expense $232,706 68 

Blue Hills Reservation 92,625 29 

Stony Brook Reservation 10,473 07 

Neponset River Reservation . . . . . 2,375 28 

Quincy Shore Reservation 19,599 42 

Middlesex Fells Reservation .... 99,006 54 

Mystic River Reservation 15,428 33 

Revere Beach Reservation 60,645 31 

Lynn Shore Reservation 21,482 06 

Winthrop Shore Reservation 9,392 02 

Cambridge Parkway '. . 48,762 85 

Charles River Upper Division 65,229 30 

Riverside Recreation Grounds . . . . . 5,212 85 

Beaver Brook Reservation . . . . . 3,534 50 

Pensions 16,138 84 

$702,612 34 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Specials: 

Clearing woods 691 00 

Band concerts . . . . 19,152 66 

Investigation, Harvard Bridge 2,288 08 

Investigation, Lynn Woods Parkway 500 00 

Westerly Border Road, W. R. P 28,894 16 

Nahant Beach Playground ........ 2,707 04 

Alewife Brook Parkway Grading 2,481 89 

Eliot Circle, Revere St. Roadway 27,787 37 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund — Boulevards, General: 

General Expense $118,417 83 

Blue Hills Parkway 12,807 70 

Neponset River Parkway 1,556 24 

Furnace Brook Parkway 16,103 42 

Hammond Pond Parkway . . . . . 3,490 50 

West Roxbury Parkway 3,062 73 

Dedham Parkway 1,318 65 

Old Colony Parkway 729 77 

Middlesex Fells Parkway 60,059 69 

Mystic Valley Parkway 35,857 10 

Lynn Fells Parkway . . . . . . . 6,502 54 

Middlesex Fells Roads 16,051 92 

Woburn Parkway 6,144 89 

Alewife Brook Parkway ...... 12,481 38 

Revere Beach Parkway 47,229 42 

Nahant Beach Parkway 9,626 50 

Lynnway 12,211 83 

Winthrop Parkway ....... 4,982 41 

Fresh Pond Parkway 4,438 58 

Neponset River Bridge 11,648 01 

$384,721 11 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund — Boulevards, Special: 

Repairs to Cottage Farm Bridge $1,726 62 

Sidewalks in Blue Hills Parkway 1,006 88 

Boulevard, Hyde Park District . . : . . . . 8,507 05 

Sidewalks, Charles River Road 2,208 22 

Charles River Basin Maintenance 184,050 74 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Nantasket . . . . 75,301 22 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Wellington Bridge . . . 15,144 17 

Bunker Hill Maintenance 9,693 12 



46 P. D. 48 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund: 

Receipts, year ending January 1, 192.5 . . . $233,339 42 
Receipts, previous to January 1, 1924 . . . 2,411,150 68 

$2,644,490 10 

Expenditures, year ending January 1, 1925 . . $121,167 98 
Expenditures, previous to January 1, 1924 . . 2,211,799 20 

2,332,967 18 

Balance $311,522 92 

WATER AND SEWERAGE DIVISIONS 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and liabilities of the 
Metropolitan District Commission, Water and Sewerage Divisions, for the State 
fiscal year, beginning with December 1, 1922, and ending with November 30, 
1924 was, in accordance with the requirements of Section 100, Chapter 92 of the 
General Laws, presented to the General Court in January last, and a copy of 
this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 4. 

As required by said section a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar 
year 1924, in relation to the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Works, is herewith 
presented. 

WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1925 §45,685,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construction and ac- 
quisition of works: 

For the period prior to January 1, 1924 $285,253 32 

For the year ending December 31, 1924 3,011 88 

288,265 20 

ReceiDt from the town of Swampscott for admission to district (St. 1909, 

c 320) _ 90.000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1925 §46,063,265 20 

Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan Fund: 

Payments prior to January 1, 1924 $44,144,436 64 

ADDroved for year ending December 31, 1924 855,532 77 

PP 44,999,969 41 

Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1925 $1,063,295 79 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1924 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent) $41,398,000 00 

Serial bonds (3|, 4 and A\ per cent) 3,149,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1924 $44,547,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1924 $366,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1924 ■ 56,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1924 $44,125,000 00 

Gross Water Debt $44,125,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1924 21,396,342 90 

Net water debt December 31, 1924 $22,728,657 10 

A decrease for the year of $173,961 04. 



P. D. 48 47 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, December 31, 1924 







Bonds 


Bonds 




T7 


Authorized 


issued 


issued 


Sinking 


Year 


Loans 


(Sinking 
Fund) 


(Serial 
Bonds) 


Fund 


1895 


$27,000,000 


$5,000,000 


_ 


$226,286 05 


1896 








- 


2,000,000 


- 


699,860 70 


1897 








- 


6,000,000 


- 


954,469 00 


1898 








- 


4,000,000 


- 


1,416,374 29 


1899 








- 


3,000,000 


- 


1,349,332 97 


1900 








- 


1,000,000 


- 


1,573,619 72 


1901 








13,000,000 


10,000,000 


- 


1,662,426 95 


1902 








- 


3,500,000 


- 


2,256,803 81 


1903 








- 


1,500,000 


- 


2,877,835 59 


1904 








- 


2,500,000 


- 


3,519,602 92 


1905 








- 


650,000 


- 


4,207,045 69 


1906 








500,000 


1,350,000 


- 


4,897,822 62 


1907 








- 


- 


- 


5,643,575 69 


1908 








398,000 


- 


- 


6,419,283 28 


1909 








900,000 


398,000 


- 


7,226,262 31 


1910 








80,000 


500,000 


- 


8,089,902 91 


1911 








212,000 


- 


$200,000 


8,953,437 44 


1912 








600,000 


- 


190,000 


9,829,356 80 


1913 








108,000 


- 


- 


10,767,701 68 


1914 








- 


- 


258,000 


11,533,453 45 


1915 








- 


- 


490,000 


12,491,245 25 


1916 








- 


- 


66,000 


13,268,199 36 


1917 








- 


- 


150,000 


14,036,278 88 


1918 








115,000 


- 


- 


14,870,834 84 


1919 








67,000 


- 


161,000 


15,904,545 14 


1920 








2,705,000 


- 


34,000 


16,953,165 15 


1921 








- 


- 


- 


18,147,014 21 


1922 








- 


- 


500,000 


19,230,940 55 


1923 








- 


- 


100,000 


20,278,381 86 


1924 








— 


— 


1,000,000 


21,396,342 90 










$45,685,000 


$41,398,000 


$3,149,000 


- 



(4) Water Assessment, 1924 

The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth upon the various municipalities : — 

Sinking fund requirements . . $190,306 67 

Serial bonds $85,000 00 

Less premium ......... 12,680 00 

= 72,320 00 

Interest 1,523,744 23 

Maintenance : 

Appropriated by Legislature 776,320 00 

Less balance on hand 13,263 86 

763,056 14 

Total water assessment for 1924 $2,549,427 04 



In accordance with Section 26, Chapter 92 of the General Laws, the proportion 
to be paid by each city and town is based one-third in proportion to their respective 



48 P. D. 48 

valuations and the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of the total valuation 
and no consumption has been taken for the city of Newton, as it has not been 
supplied with water from the Metropolitan Works. 

The division of the assessment for 1924 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns 


Assessment 


Cities and Towns 


Assessment 


Arlington 

Belmont 

Boston 

Chelsea 

Everett 

Lexington 

Maiden 

Medford 

Melrose 

Milton . 

Nahant 








$29,239 38 
18,812 22 
1,829,973 63 
66,810 29 
75,924 49 
10,557 19 
57,571 16 
52,026 17 
26,475 80 
14,738 24 
4,188 70 


Newton 
Quincy . 
Revere . 
Somerville 
Stoneham 
Swampscott 
Watertown 
Winthrop 








$7,413 74 
86,652 47 
43,289 27 
142,275 86 
11,505 56 
15,360 30 
36,204 42 
20,408 15 










$2,549,427 04 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to 

Water Companies 

Sums have been received during the year 1924 under the provisions of the 
Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as follows : — 

Town of Framingham . $7,653 49 

City of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the town 

of Saugus for the year 1923) 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island) . . f 

W T estborough State Hospital 

City of Worcester 



650 


00 


872 


36 


2,397 


04 


1,520 


00 


$13,092 89 



The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually distributed among 
the cities and towns of the district, but since that date, in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, the sums so received have been paid 
into the sinking fund. 



P. D. 48 



49 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works 



The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the various operations 
for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

the works 

Distribution System: 
Northern high service: 

Section 50 (reinforcement of the northern high-service pipe lines) 
Additional pumping machinery at Spot Pond Pumping Station . ' . 
Southern high service: 
Additional pumping machinery at Chestnut Hill Pumping Sation of 

the southern high service 

Northern extra high service: 

Arlington Reservoir in Arlington, Mass 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 1 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 9 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 10 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 11 

Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 12 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage 
yards, and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the 
work: — 

Amount received 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1925 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



$475 94 
69,240 85 



2,957 55 

46,456 62 

70,639 35 

329,634 33 

278,285 42 

51,751 08 

1,189 58 



$62,388 96 
60,313 67 



$2,826 76 



850,630 72 



2,075 29 

855,532 77 
44,144,436 64 

$44,999,969 41 



Maintenance and Operation 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



Administration 

General supervision 

Taxes and other expenses 

Filtration of water supply 

Wachusett Department: 

Superintendence 

Reservoir 

Forestry 

Protection of supply 

Buildings and grounds 

Wachusett Dam 

Wachusett Aqueduct 

Clinton Sewerage System: 

Pumping station 

Sewers, screens and filter beds 

Sanitary inspection 

Swamp drainage 

Power Plant 

Wachusett-Sudbury power transmission line 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations 

Sudbury Department: 

Superintendence, Framingham Office 

Ashland Reservoir 

Hopkinton Reservoir 

Whitehall Reservoir 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Lake Cochituate 

Marlborough Brook filters 

Pegan filters 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 

Sanitary inspection 

Cochituate Aqueduct 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

Weston Aqueduct 

Forestry \ 

Power Plant , [ 

Protection of water supply in Aqueducts 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions 



$11,861 95 

27,138 00 

17,405 94 

7,450 92 

7,989 23 

11,568 48 

8,266 02 

2,871 21 

9,900 22 

850 49 

13,906 60 

11,615 34 

97 94 

290 29 



$14,521 99 

4,861 15 

3,441 13 

4,658 70 

12,534 82 

16,738 98 

10,591 50 

6,124 18 

7,045 62 

2,290 29 

4,102 20 

4,459 74 

8,316 51 

9,921 81 

8,516 37 

11,124 57 

2 00 

118 00 



$8,614 56 

27,730 25 

49,884 46 

10,646 95 



131,212 63 



$129,369 56 



50 



P. 48D. 



Maintenance and Operation 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



Distribution Department: 

Superintendence 

Pumping service: 

Superintendence 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appro- 
priations 

Arlington Pumping Station, pumping service 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service No. 2 . 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service No. 1 . 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, pumping service 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, pumping service 

Arlington stand pipe 

Chelsea Reservoir . . . 

Bear Hill Reservoir 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds 

Fells Reservoir 

Forbes Hill Reservoir 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station 

Mystic Reservoir 

Waban Hill Reservoir ........... 

Weston Reservoir 

Spot Pond 

Buildings at Spot Pond 

Pipe lines: 

Low service 

Northern high service 

Northern extra high service 

Southern high service 

Southern extra high service 

Supply pipe lines 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings 

Stables . .... 

Venturi meters 

Measurement of water 

Arlington Pumping Station, building and grounds 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, building and grounds ..... 

Fisher Hill Reservoir 

Bellevue Reservoir 

Arlington Reservoir . . . . . . 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions 

Stock : 

Total for maintaining and operating works 



$10,255 02 


8,707 


55 


741 


86 


15,469 


39 


92,858 


04 


36,703 


28 


31,138 


72 


11,957 


35 


4 


50 


47 


76 


324 


06 


24,660 


65 


1,616 


04 


2,207 


99 


2,866 


22 


1,343 


00 


993 


09 


7,056 


18 


11,843 


70 


2,535 


65 


50,165 


54 


12,681 


07 


287 


01 


10,081 


26 


275 


85 


2,963 


80 


8,606 


89 


3,394 


07 


3,958 


42 


12,614 


42 


1,563 


82 


4,591 


59 


450 


66 


1,002 


62 


3,153 


55 


661 


97 


1,740 


75 


650 


78 


13,347 


17 




one coi on 








$752,979 70 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements of 
the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expenditures and disburse- 
ments, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 1924. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on account of con- 
struction and acquisition of works for the year beginning January 1, 1924, and 
ending December 31, 1924, was $855,532.77 and the total amount from the time 
of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 
31, 1924 has been $44,999,969.41. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year were $752,979.70. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of administration, 
have been apportioned to the construction of the works and to the maintenance 
and operation of the same and appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their general 
character : — 



P. D. 



51 



General Character of Expenditures 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by purchase or Taking 
Administration 

Clerks and stenographers 

Stationery and printing 

Postage, express and telegrams - 

Engineering 

Chief Engineer 

Principal assistant engineers 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors 

Architects 

Railroad and street car travel 

Wagon hire . . . . , 

Stationery and printing 

Postage, express and telegrams 

Engineering and draughting instruments and tools 

Engineering and draughting supplies 

Unclassified supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Construction 
Preliminary work: 

Advertising 

Contracts, Distribution System: 

The Atlantic Works, Contract 39, for furnishing water valves 

The Atlantic Works, Contract 40, for furnishing automatic air valves . 

Bryne & Co., Contract 31, for laying water pipes on Section 1 (in part) of 
the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Weston 

Crane Construction Co., Inc., Contract 32, for constructing masonry 
tower on Arlington Heights 

C. & R. Construction Co., Contract 44, for laying water pipes on Section 
10 of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, in Waltham 

James Driscoll & Son Co., Contract 42, for building engine foundation 
and making alterations at Spot Pond Pumping Station . 

T. A. Gillespie Co., Contract 37, for laying water pipes on Section 9 of 
the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Weston and Waltham 

T. A. Gillespie Co., Contract 47, for laying water pipes on Section 11 of 
the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Waltham, Belmont and 
Arlington 

Fred A. Houdlette & Son, Inc., Contract 43, for furnishing cast-iron 
frames and covers, for gate chambers 

Keasbey & Mattison Co., Contract 38, for furnishing and applying non- 
heat-conducting covering at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 
and Spot Pond Pumping Station 

Lumsden & Van Stone Co., Contract 46, for piping for new engine at 
Spot Pond Pumping Station 

Harvey L. Maney, Contract 15, for constructing reservoir foundation 
on Arlington Heights 

Smith & Lovett Co., Contract 36, for constructing and erecting galleries 
and railings for economizers at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 
and Spot Pond Pumping Station 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., Contract 41, for furnishing cast- 
iron water pipes 

Warren Foundry & Pipe Co., Contract 45, for furnishing cast-iron water 
pipes and special castings 

Worthington Pump & Machinery Corp., Contract 35, for building and 
erecting pumping engine at Spot Pond Pumping Station . 



A mount carried forward 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



$2,654 


58 




66 


37 




105 


81 


$2,826 76 






$1,525 06 




6,239 


90 




18,819 


40 




12,812 


10 




3,000 


00 


„ 


1,218 


38 
60 




242 


85 




4 


00 




12 


84 




967 


32 
45 




117 


23 


44,960 13 


$119 


40 


28,098 


00 




1,742 


58 




24,292 


28 




35,799 


83 




251,858 


77 




9,957 


90 




307,228 


89 




43,540 


40 




1,861 


05 




2,207 


00 




5,874 


00 




3,018 


35 




1,265 


00 




862 


57 




25,536 


69 




34,500 


00 


777,643 31 








$825,549 60 



52 



P. D. 48 



General Character of Expenditures 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



Amount brought forward 

Construction — Con. 
Additional work: 

Labor 

Traveling . 

Rent 

Freight and express 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies 

Electrical supplies 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Iron pipe and valves 

Paint and coating 

Fuel, oil and waste 

Lumber and field buildings 

Sand, gravel and filling 

Municipal and corporation work 

Unclassified supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses . . 

Real Estate 
Legal and expert: 

Legal services 

Appraisers 

Conveyancing expenses 

Settlements made by Board 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 

Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1925 . 

Maintenance and Operation op Works 
Administration: — 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants 

Rent 

Repairs of buildings 

Fuel 

Lighting 

Care of building 

Postage -. 

Printing, stationery, and office supplies 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses 

Miscellaneous expenses 

General supervision: 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent 

Repairs of building 

Fuel 

Lighting 

Care of building 

Postage 

Express and telegrams 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Pumping service: 

Superintendence 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing 

Repairs 

Small supplies . . . . 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropria- 
tions 

Amount carried forward 







$825,549 60 


$10,092 


51 




1,265 


00 




70 


00 




75 


37 




258 


73 




652 


40 




5,871 


86 




2,124 


64 




159 


64 




70 


37 




366 


18 




875 


00 




6,547 


21 




795 


52 




97 


91 


29,322 34 






$12 47 




175 


00 




23 


36 


210 83 
450 00 






$855,532 77 






44,144,436 64 






544,999,969 41 


$2,500 00 




3,535 


00 




572 


06 




68 


69 




75 


96 




73 


28 




431 


09 




90 


24 




838 


36 




98 


57 




20 


00 




311 


31 


$8,614 56 






$20,367 


48 




1,716 


16 




206 


13 




227 


93 




219 


84 




1,292 


10 




158 


15 




313 


37 




1,516 


73 




601 


13 




704 


89 




406 


34 


27,730 25 


$8,707 


55 


117,879 


39 




56,271 


54 


* 


2,164 


91 




9,116 


33 




2,694 


61 




741 


86 


197,576 19 






$233,921 00 



P. D. 48 



53 



General Character of Expenditures 



Amount brought forward 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: 

Superintendents 

Engineering assistants 

Sanitary inspectors 

Labor, pay roll 

Labor, miscellaneous ........ a . . 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures .... 

Automobiles 

Brick 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Cement and lime 

Drafting and photo supplies 

Electrical supplies 

Fertilizer and planting material 

Freight and express 

Fuel 

Gypsy moth supplies 

Hardware 

Hay and grain . 

Lighting 

Lumber 

Machinery 

Paints and oils 

Pipe and fittings 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Rubber and oiled goods 

Stable expenses 

Sand, gravel and stone 

Traveling expenses 

Telephones 

Teaming 

Tools and appliances 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Contracts: . 

Charles V. Browne, Contract 20-M, for repairing roofs of Water Works 
buildings located in Boston, Brookline and Newton .... 

Charles V. Browne, Contract 22-M, for repairing roofs of Water 
Works buildings located in Stoneham and Weston .... 

R. Maitland & Son, authorized by vote of Commission, November 6, 
1924, for installing bath-room and water supply outfit in George A. 
Twine's residence, Sterling Junction 

The P. H. Provencal Co., Contract 19-M, for constructing gate house at 

Whitehall Dam in Hopkinton 

Stock: 

Inspection 

Special castings • 

Contract : 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe and Fdy. Co., Contract 18-M, for cast-iron pipe 

and special castings . . 

Improvement and protection of water supplies 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations . 

Filtration of water supply 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation .... 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 





$233,921 00 


$8,993 33 




19,661 32 




4,115 00 




320,043 98 




193 33 




1,114 88 




5,940 27 




17,228 50 




855 52 


- 


337 48 




994 27 




427 25 




352 97 




1,535 05 




5,336 74 




627 88 




4,900 47 




1,611 61 




2,672 37 




746 22 




494 59 




2,376 65 




768 22 




1,543 98 




1,048 22 




63 90 




1,161 79 




497 74 




1,007 51 




1,907 79 




3,568 35 




1,558 81 




3,902 10 




5,850 66 




66 38 




13,454 38 




2,648 07 




1,632 85 




495 00 




358 05 




570 00 




337 67 




12,465 07 




2,002 00 




1,059 07 






458,527 29 
10,646 95 






49,884 46 




$752,979 70 



(b) Receipts 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Commission and from 
sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1924, and ending December 31, 
1924, was $114,271.22 and the total amount from the time of the organization of 
the Metropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1924, has been 
$2,192,503.86. The general character of these receipts is as follows: — 



54 


P. D. 48 


General Character of Receipts 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 


Applicable to the loan fund: 


$1,381 15 
1,630 73 


Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 
of maintenance and operation: 
Proceeds from operations of the Board: 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements 


$3,846 55 

11,432 48 

74,859 15 

7,979 64 

48 63 


Applicable to the sinking fund: 

Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others . 


13,092 89 


Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 

Total receipts to January 1, 1925 


$114,271 22 
2,078,232 64 

$2,192,503 86 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects or works, as 
follows : — 



Sources of Receipts 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 


Construction and acquisition of works: 


$13,092 89 

$569 46 

1,592 42 

850 00 


Maintenance and operation of works: 


$52 43 

104 19 

812 70 

12,848 13 

42,786 32 

2,158 08 

32,106 73 

7,035 37 

262 50 






Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 


$114,271 22 
2,078,232 64 

$2,192,503 86 



(c) Assets 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the water works, a complete schedule 
of which is kept on file in the office of the Commission : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments and 
supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, 
tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate and 
buildings connected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities 
There are sundry bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 



P. D. 48 55 

Amount of Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contract or until Claims 

are settled 



Name 


Work 


Amount 


The Atlantic Works 


Contract 40, for furnishing automatic air 






valves 


$307 52 




Contract 22-M, for repairing roofs of Water 
Works buildings located in Stoneham and 








288 15 




Contract 3 1 , for laying water pipes on Section 1 
(in part) of the Weston Aqueduct Supply 








500 00 


C. & R. Construction Co 


Contract 44, for laying water pipes on Sec- 
tion 10 of the Weston Aqueduct Supply 






Mains in Waltham 


27,984 31 


T. A. Gillespie Co. . . 


Contract 37, for laying water pipes on Section 9 
of the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in 






Weston and Waltham 


17,469 88 


T. A. Gillespie Co 


Contract 47, for laying water pipes on 
Section 11 of the Weston Aqueduct Supply 






Mains in Waltham, Belmont and Arlington 


4,837 82 


Warren Foundry & Pipe Co. 


Contract 45, for furnishing cast-iron water 






pipes and special castings .... 


4,506 48 


Worthington Pump & Machinery Corp. . 


Contract 35, for building and erecting pumping 






engine at Spot Pond Pumping Station 


34,500 00 



Settlements are pending with the following parties for land and easements taken 
in lands owned by them : — 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, heirs of Ella Wood, 
Brayton D. Fisher, heirs of Andrew Temple, city of Medford. Georgia N. 
Mayberry et als., Tr., Charles W. Perkins, Tr., James E. Norton and Estate of 
Daniel L. Barry, Carolin R. Lawrence, Walter S. Sherman, heirs of John T. 
Malloy, Waltham Hospital Corporation, Mount Feake Cemetery Corporation, 
Boston & Maine Railroad, Estate of William Roberts, Mary A. Glynn, city of 
Waltham, City of Cambridge, William E. Peterson, Eva L. Phipps. 



SEWERAGE WORKS 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, 
the receipts which are added to the proceeds of these loans, the expenditures for 
construction, and the balances available on January 1, 1925, have been as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System 
Loans authorized under various acts to January 1, 1925, for the construction of the North 

Metropolitan System and the various extensions $8,312,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources which are placed to the 
credit of the North Metropolitan System: 

For the year ending December 31, 1924 $52 66 

For the period prior to January 1, 1924 87,513 38 

87,566 04 



$8,399,931 77 
Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, 
North System: 

For the year ending December 31, 1924 $182,869 51 

For the period prior to January 1, 1924 7,623,759 27 

7,806,628 78 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1925 $593,302 99 

South Metropolitan System 
Loans authorized under the various acts to January 1, 1925, applied to the 
construction of the Charles River Valley Sewer, Neponset Valley Sewer, 
high-level sewer and extensions, constituting the South Metropolitan 

System $9,992,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources, 
which are placed to the credit of the South Metropolitan System: 

For the year ending December 31, 1924 - 

For the period prior to January 1, 1924 24,599 61 

24,599 61 

Amount carried forward $10,016,645 88 



56 P. D. 48 

South Metropolitan System 

Amount brought forward .... $10,016,645 88 

Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, 
South System: 

On account of the Charles River Valley Sewer $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset Valley Sewer 911,531 46 

On account of the high-level sewer and extensions, including Wellesley 
extension: 
For the year ending December 31, 1924 .... 31,849 93 

For the period prior to January 1, 1924 .... 8,261,031 32 

2 8,292,881 25 

10,004,458 98 

Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1925 12,186 90 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1924 

North Metropolitan System 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3£ per cent) 6,563,000 00 

Serial bonds (3£ and 4 per cent) 1,075,500 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1924 $7,638,500 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1924 $236,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1924 29,500 00 

265,500 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1924 $7,373,000 00 

Gross sewerage debt 7,373,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1924 4,483,533 09 

Net sewerage debt December 31, 1924 $2,889,466 91 

A net decrease for the year of $370,420 26. 

South Metropolitan System 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3£ per cent) $8,877,912 00 

Serial bonds (4, 4£ and 5 per cent) 1,125,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1924 $10,002,912 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1924 $179,000 00 

Serial bonds paid in 1924 32,000 00 

211,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1924 $9,791,912 00 

Gross sewerage debt 9,791,912 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1924 2,870,000 68 

Net sewerage debt December 31, 1924 $6,921,911 32 

A net decrease for the year of $292,429.88. 



P. D. 48 57 

(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 

81, 1924 





Loans 


Bonds Issued 
(Sinking Fund) 


Bonds Issued 
(Serial Bonds) 


Sinking 
Fund 


Year 


North 
System 


South 
System 


North 

System 


South 
System 


North 
System 


South 
System 


North and 
South 

Systems 


1889 . 
1890 
1891 
1892 

1893 . 

1894 . 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 . 


$5,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

300,000 00 

30,000 00 

85,000 00 

215,000 00 

265,000 00 

500,000 00 

55,000 00 

413,000 00 

56,000 00 

6,000 00 

378,000 00 

130,500 00 
83,000 00 2 
285,000 00 

150,000 00 
650,000 00 


500,000 00 

300,000 00 

35,000 00 

4,625,000 00 

10,912 001 

40,000 00 

1,000,000 00 
392,000 00 

1,175,000 00 

350,000 00 

5,000 00 

40,000 00 

325,000 00 

225,000 00 
100,000 00 

80,000 00 


$2,200,000 

368,000 

1,-053,000 

579,000 

500,000 

300,000 

30,000 

80,000 

220,000 

265,000 

500,000 

55,000 

300,000 
113,000 


$800,000 

300,000 

200,000 

300,000 

35,000 

1,025,000 
10,912 

2,040,000 
864,000 

1,736,000 
392,000 

175,000 
300,000 
700,000 


$62,000 
378,000 

130,500 

70,000 

285,000 

150,000 


$355,000 

40,000 

325,000 

225,000 

100,000 
80,000 


$361,416 59 
454,520 57 
545,668 26 
636,084 04 
754,690 41 
878,557 12 
1,008,724 95 
1,146,998 68 
1,306,850 30 
1,492,418 98 
1,673,784 40 
1,931,741 89 
2,184,674 98 
2,458,541 20 
2,749,337 90 
3,011,512 44 
3,290,979 46 
3,604,657 27 
3,925,792 75 
4,270,205 50 
4,695,573 07 
5,168,524 03 
5,698,228 38 
6,217,099 57 
6,752,183 63 
7,353,533 77 




$9,101,500 OO 3 
789,134 27 


$9,202,912 00 
789,134 27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




$8,312,365 73 
1 


$9,992,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$1,075,500 


$1,125,000 


- 



1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 This amount includes $13,000, balance of appropriation for north metropolitan maintenance under Chap- 
ter 775, Acts of 1914, which was transferred to North Metropolitan Loan Fund, under authority of Chapter 
76, Resolves of 1915. No bonds to be issued, as this was cash. 

3 Of this amount, $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River Valley Sewer, which 
is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 

(4) Sewer Assessments, 1924 

The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth upon the various municipalities: 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System 

Sinking fund requirements $172,583 71 

Serial bonds 27,000 00 

Interest 240,553 75 

Maintenance: 

Appropriated by Legislature $335,200 00 

Less balance on hand 18,476 17 

316,723 83 

Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment $756,861 29 



58 P. D. 48 

South Metropolitan Sewerage System 

Sinking fund requirements $154 398 88 

Serial bonds . \ 32^000 00 

Interest 349,622 53 

Maintenance: 

Appropriated by Legislature $224,420 00 

Less balance on hand 7,235 58 

' '■ ■ 217,184 42 

Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment $753,205 83 

In accordance with the provision of Sections 5 and 6, Chapter 92 of the General' 
Laws, the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest and 
sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their respective taxable 
valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance and operation upon their respective 
populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1924 were as follows: — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System 



Cities and towns 



Arlington 

Belmont 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Everett 1 

Lexington 

Maiden 1 

Medford 

Melrose 



Assessment 



$25,182 95 

15,966 93 

109,563 37 

154,258 49 

47,973 43 

49,766 52 

7,091 89 

54,283 34 

44,386 58 

22,848 59 



Cities and Towns 



Reading . 

Revere 1 

Somerville 

Stoneham 

Wakefield 

Winchester 

Winthrop . 

Woburn 

Total 



Assessment 



$9,798 90 

31,577 93 

102,039 97 

8,700 20 

15,686 36 

20,153 59 

18,858 18 

18,724 07 



56,861 29 * 



Exclusive of $3,760.01 special assessments on Everett, Maiden and Revere. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System 



Cities and Towns 


Assessment 


Cities and Towns 


Assessment 


Boston 
Brookline . 
Dedham 
Milton 


$364,836 51 
98,976 16 
16,141 72 
20,841 60 
91,177 10 
65,683 75 


Waltham 

Total 


46,020 42 
32,500 60 
17,027 97 


Newton 
Quincy 


$753,205 83 



(5) Expenditures for the Different Works 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the various operations 
for the different works : — 



P. D. 48 



59 



CONSTKUCTION AND ACQUISITION OF WORKS 




For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 


North Metropolitan System 
North System, enlargement: 

New Mystic Sewer in Woburn and Winchester (Chapter 529, Acts of 1922) : 
Section 71 $49,738 28 

Real estate: 

Settlements 825 00 

Real estate: (sewer in Reading and Wakefield): 

Settlements . 473 00 


$960 00 

117,041 40 
64,868 11 


$182,869 
7,623,759 

$7,806,628 

31,849 
9,972,609 

$10,004,458 

$17,811,087 




Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Medford and Arlington (Chapter 
116, Acts of 1924): 

Section 77 $64,842 

Real estate: 


12 
99 






of 


51 


Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 

Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1925 . 
South Metropolitan System 
High-level sewer extensions: 

Quincy Pumping Station and Force Main No. 2 (Chapter 529, Acts 
1922) : 

Force Main No. 2 

Additions to Ward St. Pumping Station Plant . . 


$593 00 

4,860 93 
26,396 00 


27 
78 

93 


Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1925 




05 

98 
76 



Maintenance and Operation 


For the year ending 
December 31, 1924 




$334,865 94 
214,623 59 




$549,489 53 



(6) Detailed Financial Statement 

The Commissioner herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, receipts, assets 
and liabilities for the year ending December 31,1924: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements 



General Character of Expenditures 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking 

North System Enlargement 
Administration : 

Clerks and stenographers 

Engineering: 

Chief engineer 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors 

Traveling expenses 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Engineering and draughting supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Amount carried forward 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 





$960 00 


$1,375 01 




3,954 04 




1,666 99 




90 90 




140 56 




28 14 




292 93 






$7,548 57 



60 



P. D. 48 



General Character of Expenditures 



Amount brought forward 

North System Enlargement — Con. 

Construction: 

Advertising 

Labor and teaming 

Tools, machinery and appliances 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses . 

Contracts: 

V. J. Grande, Contract 14, for constructing Section 71 of the New Mystic 

Sewer in Winchester 

Antony Cefalo, Contract 16, for constructing Section 72 of the New 

Mystic Sewer in Winchester and Woburn . . 
Anthony Baruffaldi Co., Contract 18, for constructing Section 77 of the 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Medford and Arlington .... 

Real estate: 

Legal, conveyancing and expert 

Settlements ' . 

Total for North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan Ststem 
High-level Sewer Extensions 
Administration : 

Clerks and stenographers . . . - 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Contracts: 

Bryne & Co., Contract 12, for constructing 30-inch force-main, of the 

high-level sewer, in Quincy, Mass 

Starkweather & Broadhurst, Inc., Contract 13, for furnishing engine and 
pump for the Ward Street Pumping Station 

Total for South Metropolitan System . . . . . 

Maintenance and Operation op Works 
North Metropolitan System 
Administration : 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants 

Bent 

Heating, lighting and care of building 

Repairs of building 

Postage m 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones 

Miscellaneous expenses 

General supervision: 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent 

Heating, lighting and care of building 

Repairs of building 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Deer Island Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

East Boston Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel • 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Amount carried forward 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 







57,548 57 


$38 

862 

1,070 

23,532 


50 
50 
16 

68 




47,043 


43 




58,694 


21 




41,170 


45 


172,411 93 






651 

1,298 


01 
00 


1,949 01 






$182,869 51 



$575 00 
18 00 



$4,860 93 
26,396- 00 



$593 00 



31,256 93 
$31,849 93 



$1,666 


68 




2,090 


00 




287 


83 




301 


62 




15 


70 




50 


15 




410 


07 




48 


77 




18 


20 


$4,889 02 






$9,203 


33 




863 


54 




904 


94 




47 


15 




106 


00 




344 


99 




146 


32 




160 


00 




117 


50 


11,893 77 






$33,244 


56 




20,687 


16 




715 


77 




1,281 


72 




103 


30 




1,500 


62 




369 


88 




262 


72 


58,165 73 






$38,319 


94 




23,553 


60 




941 


06 




1,333 


20 




216 


17 




$64,363 97 


$74,948 52 



P. D. 48 



61 



General Character of Expenditures 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



Amount brought forward 

North Metropolitan System • — Con. 

East Boston Pumping Station — Con. 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies . • . 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Charlestown Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Reading Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Packing 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: 

Engineering assistants 

Labor 

Automobiles 

Brick, cement and lime 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Freight, express and teaming 

Fuel and lighting 

Jobbing and repairing 

Lumber 

Machinery, tools and appliances 

Paints and oils 

Rubber and oiled goods 

Sand, gravel and stone 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Horses, vehicles and stable account 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations 

Mill Brook Valley Sewer Investigation (Item 670|, Chapter 494, Acts of 
1923, reappropriated by Resolve 17, Acts of 1924): — 

Engineering 

Additional 

Real estate: — 

Legal, conveyancing and expert 

Total for North Metropolitan System 

South Metropolitan System 
Administration : 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants 

Rent 

Heating, lighting and care of building 

Repairs of building 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Amount carried forward 



$64,363 97 $74,948 52 



2,712 


84 




1,179 


65 




129 


87 


68,386 33 






$24,543 32 




11,734 


24 




708 


61 




1,038 


84 




105 


91 




7,883 


97 




430 


64 




117 


26 


46,562 79 






$12,815 


82 




4,188 


83 




373 


79 




411 


96 




67 


36 




163 


13 




75 


73 




27 


92 


18,124 54 


$6,738 20 


299 


26 




25 


91 




4,327 


92 




2 


20 


11,393 49 






$3,065 


00 




69,752 


43 




741 


02 




1,285 


05 




1,711 


24 




137 


64 




255 


84 




6,886 


97 




2,453 


56 




1,794 


97 




1,534 


87 




403 


03 




354 


66 




390 


55 




3,254 


25 




3,009 


18 




2,790 


43 


99,820 69 










4,241 91 






1,682 68 


$9,177 


67 




515 


30 




12 


02 


9,704 99 






$334,865 94 


833 


32 




2,285 


00 




230 


47 




255 


83 




12 


26 




52 


15 




365 


16 




48 


76 




37 


82 


4,120 77 




— 


$4,120 77 



62 



P. D. 48 



General Character of Expenditures 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1924 



Amount brought forward 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
General supervision: 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent .... 

Heat, lighting and care of building 

Repairs of building 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Ward Street Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals . ' ' . 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Quincy Pumping Station: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Nut Island Screen-house: 

Labor 

Fuel 

Oil and waste 

Water 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Sewer Lines, buildings and grounds: 

Engineering assistants . . . 

Labor 

Automobiles 

Brick, cement and lime 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Freight, express and teaming 

Fuel and lighting 

Jobbing and repairing 

Lumber 

Machinery, tools and appliances 

Paints and oils 

Rubber and oiled goods 

Sand, gravel and stone 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses 

City of Boston for pumping 

Horses, vehicles and stable account 

Payments under industrial accident law and special benefit appropriations 

Total for South Metropolitan System 







$4,120 77 


$4,819 


99 




691 


37 




767 


66 




36 


81 




8 


00 




129 


61 




146 


29 




7 


50 


6,607 23 






$42,727 


42 




24,942 


56 




507 


02 




1,355 


64 




938 


87 




4,272 


44 




15,663 


92 




1,831 


65 


92,239 52 






$14,077 


40 




7,340 


40 




426 


19 




614 


20 




70 


03 




11 


51 




381 


66 




184 


63 


23,106 02 






$13,277 


85 




4,557 


19 




217 


04 




214 


83 




21 


12 




50 


73 




311 


16 




134 


57 


18,784 49 






$6,220 


00 




40,598 


35 




305 


44 




222 


83 




1,209 


46 




23 


93 




46 


03 




4,206 


03 




361 


49 




273 


19 




345 


63 




122 


73 




212 


91 




198 


68 




429 


00 




1,292 


01 




108 


91 


56,176 62 










10,300 00 






2,582 61 






706 33 




$214,623 59 



(b) Receipts 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other sources, 
have been credited as follows : — 



P. D. 48 



Account 



63 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1924 



Construction : 

North Metropolitan System 
Maintenance: 

North Metropolitan 

South Metropolitan 
Sinking fund: 

North Metropolitan System 
Interest fund: 

North Metropolitan 

South Metropolitan 



System 
System 



System 
System 



52 66 

1,348 70 
864 20 

75 00 

25 60 

26 67 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1924 
Total receipts to January 1, 1925 



$2,392 83 
164,549 72 



$166,942 55 



(c) Assets 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the sewerage works, a complete 
schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the Commission : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments and 
supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and other 
appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities 
There are sundry bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until Claims 

are settled 



Name 


Work 


Amount 


High-level sewer extensions: 

Timothy O'Connell .... 
North System — Enlargement: 

Anthony Baruffaldi .... 

Antonv Cefalo 


Contract 57, Section 82 (in part) 

Contract 18, Section 77, Mill Brook Valley Sewer 
Contract 16, Section 72 of New Mystic Sewer . 


$60 00 

7,265 37 • 
3,089 17 



Settlements are pending with the following parties for easements taken in lands 
owned by them : — 

Clifford M. Locke, Martha W. Burrage, Edward and Catherine Bingham, 
Hannah Bingham, Katherine H. Rooney, Mary A. Read, Hannah E. Pond, Richard 
G. Wadsworth, Bear Hill Associates, Stoneham Branch Railroad, Arthur L., 
Frank W. and Harry T. Winn, Arthur A. Bellville, Est. of Joseph E. Bellville, 
Mary R. Cross, Town of Winchester, Joseph W. Perry, Est. of Samuel Strike, 
City of Woburn, Imperial Realty Trust, Tr., Annie S. Kiley, Henry Higgins, 
Edmund M. Warren, Tr., Michael McNulty, Bertha M. Hall, James H. Pillman, 
Eastern Mass. Street Railway Co., Atlantic Gelatine Co., Town of Arlington, 
L. Nellie Russell and Irving F. Carpenter, Trustees. 



64 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 1 



Contracts made and pending during the 

[The details of Contracts made before 





1 

Num- 


2 


3 


Amount 


of Bid 


6 




4 


5 






ber of 




Num- 










Con- 
tract 


WORK 


ber of 
Bids 


Next to 
Lowest 


Lowest 


Contractor 


1 


31 1 


Laying 60-inch cast-iron 
water pipes in Weston. 


10 


$50,125 00 


$40,866 90 2 


Bryne & Company, 
Boston. 


2 


32 1 


Constructing Northern Extra- 
High Service Reservoir on 
Arlington Heights(Masonry 
Tower) . 


3 


157,894 00 


154,858 00 2 


Crane Construction 
Company, Inc., 
Boston. 


3 


35 


Building and erecting pump- 
ing engine for Spot Pond 
Pumping Station. 


3 


69,000 00 2 


67,470 00 


Worthington Pump & 
Machinery Corpo- 
ration, New York. 


4 


36 1 


Furnishing and erecting gal- 
lery and railing for economi- 
zer at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Sta. No. 1 and galleries 
and railing for boiler at Spot 
Pond Pumping Station. 


3 


1,290 00 


1,265 00 2 


Smith & Lovett Com- 
pany, Boston. 


5 


37 1 


Furnishing and laying 60-inch 
steel water pipes in Weston 
and Waltham, Section 9 of 
Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Mains. 


13 


341,790 00 


320,413 00 2 


T. A. Gillespie Com- 
pany, New York. 


6 


38 1 


Furnishing and applying non- 
heat-conducting covering 
at Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station in Boston and Spot 
Pond Pumping Station in 
Stoneham. 


5 


2,488 00 


.2,207 00 2 


Keasbey & Mattison 
Company, Boston. 


7 


391 


Furnishing water valves; 24 
16-inch screw lift; 3 36-inch 
screw lift and 3 36-inch hy- 
draulic lift valves. 


3 


35,144 00 


28,098 00 2 


Atlantic Works, East 
Boston. 


8 


40 


Furnishing automatic air 
valves. 


2 


3,125 00 


2,232 50 2 


Atlantic Works, East 
Boston. 


9 


41 1 


Furnishing cast iron water 
pipes. 


1 


" 


868 50 2 


United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foun- 
dry Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 


10 


42i 


Building engine foundation 
and making alteration at 
Spot Pond Pumping Station 


4 


10,975 00 


9,930 00 2 


James Driscoll & Son 
Company, Brook- 
line, Mass. 


11 


43 1 


Furnishing cast-iron frames 
and covers for gate cham- 
bers: about 40,000 pounds. 


2 


1,980 00 


1,900 00 2 


Fred A. Houdlette & 
Son, Inc., Boston. 


12 


44 


Furnishing and laying 60- 
inch steel water pipes in 
Waltham, Section 10 of 
Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Mains. 


4 


695,620 00 


563,230 00 2 


C. and R. Construc- 
tion Co., Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 



P. D. 48 



65 



Appendix No. 1 



Year 1924 — Water Division 

1924 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of Con- 
tract 



8 



Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 



10 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1924 



June 28, 1923 June 20, 1924 See previous annual report 



July 17, 1923 

Oct. 18, 1923 
Dec. 26, 1923 

Feb. 1, 1924 



June 12, 1924 



Feb. 20, 1924 



Oct. 14, 1924 



Feb. 4, 1924 

Mar. 4, 1924 

Mar. 31, 1924 
Apr. 28, 1924 

Apr. 16, 1924 

Apr. 23, 1924 
July 10, 1924 



Apr. 16, 1924 
Oct. 16, 1924 

June 4, 1924 
July 1, 1924 

Aug. 1, 1924 



See previous annual report. 

See previous annual report. 
See previous annual report. 



For furnishing and laying 60-inch steel pipes, $27.25 
per lin. ft. ; laying 60-inch, 48-inch and 36-inch cast- 
iron pipes, $15.00 per lin. ft.; laying 24-inch and 
smaller cast-iron pipes for blow-offs, $10.00 per 
lin. ft.: for rock excavation above grade, $3.00 per 
cu. yd.; for rock excavation below grade, $1.00 per 
cu. yd.; for earth excavation below grade, $3.00 per 
cu. yd.; for chambers for blow-off, by-pass and con- 
nection valves, $181 per chamber; for chambers for 
36-inch valves, $251 per chamber; for chambers for 
air valves, $181 per chamber; for concrete ma- 
sonry, $11.00 per cu. yd. 

For furnishing and applying non-heat-conducting 
covering at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1, 
$698; for furnishing and applying non-heat-con- 
ducting covering at Spot Pond Pumping Station, 
$1,509. 

For 16-inch screw lift valves, $641 per valve; for 36- 
inch screw lift valves, $1,919 per valve; for 36-inch 
hydraulic lift valves, $2,319 per valve. 

For automatic air valves, $79.70 per valve; for at- 
taching air valves to manhole covers, $9.60 per 
set. 

For 6-inch straight pipe, Class G, $57.90 per ton of 
2,000 pounds. 



For masonry excavation, $20.00 per cu. yd.; for earth 
excavation, $7.00 per cu. yd.; for concrete masonry, 
Class A, $15.00 per cu. yd., Class B, $18.00 per cu. 
yd.; for structural steelwork, $0.10 per lb.; for re- 
placing slate and granolithic surfaces, $1.00 per sq.ft. 

For cast iron frames and covers for gate chambers, 
delivered, $0.04$ per pound. 

For furnishing and laying 60-inch steel pipe § inch in 
thickness, of the lock-bar type, $35.00 per lin. f t. ; for 
furnishing and laying 60-inch steel pipe £ inch in 
thickness of the lock-bar type, $40.00 per lin. ft.; for 
laying 60-inch and 36-inch cast-iron pipe furnished 
by the Commonwealth, $10.00 per lin. ft.; for laying 
16-inch and smaller cast-iron pipe furnished by the 
Commonwealth.for blow-offs and connections, $6.00 
per lin. ft. ; for rock excavation, above regular grade, 
$8.00 per cu. yd., below regular grade, $15.00 per 
cu. yd.; for earth excavation below regular grade, 
$5.00 per cu. yd.; for chambers,for blow-off,by-pass 
and connection valves, $140 per chamber, for 36- 
inch valves, $200 per chamber, for air valves, $100 
per chamber; for concrete masonry for foundations, 
anchorages and support forpipes,$14.00 per cu.yd.; 
for spruce lumber in place for foundations in wet 
ground, $60.00 per M. ft. B. M. 



$44,486 51 
158,873 03 

48,300 00 
1,265 00 

327,780 91 



2,207 00 

28,098 00 

2,700 00 
862 57 

9,957 90 

1,861 05 

336,478 48 



8 
9 

10 

11 
12 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



66 



P. D. 48 

Contracts made and pending during the 





1 

Num- 


2 


3 


Amount 


of Bid _ 


6 




4 


5 






ber of 
Con- 
tract 


WORK 


Num- 
ber of 
Bids 


Next to 
Lowest 


Lowest 


Contractor 


13 


45 1 


Furnishing 40 tons 36-inch 
and 133 tons 60-inch cast- 
iron water pipe, and 158 
tons special castings. 


1 


- 


$28,692 70 


Warren Foundry & 
Pipe Co., Phillips- 
burg, N. J. 


14 


46 


Furnishing flanged special 
castings, approximately 19 
tons. 


2 


$5,525 00 


5,500 00 2 


The Lumsden & Van 
Stone Co., Boston. 


15 


47 


Furnishing and laying 56- 
inch steel water pipes in 
Waltham, Belmont and Ar- 
lington, Section 11 of Wes- 
ton Aqueduct Supply Mains 


7 


580,715 00 
(or for 60- 
inch riveted 
steel pipe 
$543,755 00) 


512,629 00 2 


T. A. Gillespie Com- 
pany, New York. 


16 


18-Mi 


Furnishing 30 tons cast-iron 
water pipe and 135 tons spe- 
cial castings. 


2 


25,207 50 


20,830 00 2 


U. S. Cast Iron Pipe 
& Foundry Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 


17 


20-M 1 


Repairing roofs of Water 
Works buildings in Boston, 
Brookline and Newton. 


2 


5,942 00 


5,781 00 2 


Charles V. Browne, 
Winthrop, Mass. 


18 


21-M 


Sale and cutting of chestnut 
and miscellaneous standing 
timber on marginal lands of 
the Wachusett Reservoir. 


2 


5,000 00 4 


9,750 00 2 3 


Wilder, Walker & 
Davis Co., Sterling, 
Mass. 


19 


22-M 


Repairing roofs of Water 
Works buildings in Stone- 
ham and Weston. 


2 


3,975 00 


3,760 00 2 


Charles V. Browne, 
Winthrop, Mass. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 



P. D. 48 
Year 1924 



67 



Water Division — Continued 



7 



Date of Con- 
tract 



Apr. 30, 1924 

May 3, 1924 
Oct. 3, 1924 



Date of 
Completion 
of Contract 



Apr. 30, 1923 
Sept. 25, 1923 
Dec. 7, 1923 

Oct. 7, 1924 



Sept. 25, 1924 



Oct. 8, 1924 



Oct. 8, 1924 



Feb. 11, 1924 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 



For 36-inch straight pipe Class D, $48.10 per ton 
of 2,000 lbs.; for 60-inch straight pipe, Class D, 
$59.90 per ton of 2,000 lbs.; for bell and spigot 
special castings, $119 per ton of 2,000 lbs. 

For furnishing ten special flanged castings, weighing 
approximately 19 tons, $5,500. 

For furnishing and laying 56-inch lock-bar steel pipe, 
$26.84 per Tin. ft.; for laying 16-inch and smaller 
cast-iron pipe, furnished by the Commonwealth.for 
blow-off s and connections, $8.00 perlin. ft.; for lay- 
ing 6-inch cast-iron pipes, furnished by the Common- 
wealth, for air inlets, $2.00 per lin. ft.; for rock ex- 
cavation, above established grade, $5.00 per cu. yd., 
below established grade, $2.00 per cu. yd. ; for earth 
excavation below established grade, $1.00 per cu. 
yd.; for chambers, for 36-inch valves, $200 per 
chamber, for blow-off, by-pass and connection 
valves, $120 per chamber, for air valves, $75.00 
per chamber; for concrete masonry for foundations, 
anchorages, and support for pipes, $12.00 per cu. 
yd.; for bituminous macadam resurfacing in streets, 
$1.10 per sq. yd. 

See previous annual report 

See previous annual report 

See previous annual report 



For repairing roof of Spot Pond Pumping Station, 
$1,670; for repairing roofs of gate houses at Spot 
Pond, $650; for repairing gate chambers in Wes- 
ton, $1,100; for removing tiles, applying paper and 
replacing tiles on certain sections of roofs, $4.00 
per sq. yd. 

3 Highest bid. 

4 Next to highest bid. 



10 



Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1924 



30,043 17 

5,874 00 
118,721 68 



21,245 57 
5,781 00 
8,450 00 

2,200 00 



13 

14 
15 



16 
17 
18 

19 



68 P. D. 48 

Contracts made and pending during the Year 1924 — Water Division — 

Concluded 

Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1924, inclusive z 





Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1924 




$1,055,779 40 
61,729 90 




$1,117,509 30 
18,207,496 92 


Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston . 


$19,325,006 22 
512,000 00 




$18,813,006 22 



In this summary contracts for the sale of used material and contracts charged to maintenance are 

excluded. 



P. D. 48 



69 



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Wachusett Watershed: 
Sudbury Watershed: 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir .... 

Average of all 

Average, Wachusett Watershed . 
Average, Sudbury Watershed 



70 P. D. 48 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1924- 



Date 


Amount^ 


Duration 


Date 


Amount 


Duration 


Jan. 2 


\ .75 2 


11.15 p.m. to 


July 9 


.12 


9.35 p.m. to 10.40 p.m. 


Jan. 3 


4.00 p.m. 


July 10 


.11 


4.30 p.m. to 5.10 p.m. 


Jan. 5 


.271 


8.00 a.m. to 3.15 A.M. 


July 12 


} ' 16 


5.55 a.m. to 


Jan. 10 


.06 


10.10 p.m. to 4.15 A.M. 


July 13 


6.30 p.m. 


Jan. 11 


.48 


8.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. 


July 17 


.40 


1.30 p.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


Jan. 16 


.85 


5.40 p.m. to 1.30 a.m. 


July 24 


.22 


6.00 p.m. to 6.50 p.m. 


Jan. 24 


1.19 2 


11.35 p.m. to 5.45 a.m. 


July 25 


.05 


3.40 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. 








July 27 


.05 


8.30 a.m. to 9.45 a.m. 






Total 


3.60 




July 31 


.77 


4.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 




1.88 












Feb. 2 


\ .101 


12.15 a.m. to 








Feb. 3 


| 1.15 2 


10.00 A.M. 

8.00 a.m. to 








Feb. 4 








Feb. 7 




9.45 a.m. 


August 4 . 


.02 


5.50 a.m. to 6.30 a.m. 


Feb. 10 


.131 


11.15 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


August 6 . 


.14 


8.10 p.m. to 9.05 p.m. 


Feb. 17 


.081 


11.00 p.m. to 3.30 a.m. 


August 7 . 


.16 


5.50 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


Feb. 19 


\ 1 . 532 


2.00 a.m. to 


August 10 . 


.23 


8.10 p.m. to 10.45 p.m. 


Feb. 20 




6.30 p.m. 


August 11 . 


\ 1.41 


5.10 a.m. to 








August 12 . 


7.30 p.m. 








2.99 




August 17 . 


.39 


1.40 p.m. to 4.30 a.m. 








August 20 . 


.05 


7.15 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 








August 23 . 


.02 


10.45 a.m. to 12.15 p.m. 


March 5 . 


.03 


9.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 


August 25 . 


\ 3.78 


5.40 P.M. to 


March 6 . 


\ .04 


3.30 a.m. to 


August 26 . 


5.00 p.m. 


March 7 . 




8.30 p.m. 








March 10 . 


| 1.76 2 


11.20 p.m. to 




6.20 




March 12 . 




8.30 p.m. 








March 29 . 


.42 
.11 


3.05 p.m. to 3.30 a.m. 
5.15 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 








March 30 . 














Sept. 1 


.48 


10.15 a.m. to 11.45 A.M. 








2.36 




Sept. 2 


.51 


7.05 p.m. to 5.30 a.m. 








Sept. 5 
Sept. 8 


.47 
.05 


9.00 p.m. to 12.15 a.m. 








1.45 a.m. to 6.10 a.m. 


April 1 


) 1.55 2 


7.30 p.m. to 


Sept. 9 


\ 5.72 


8.50 p.m. to 


April 2 




9.10 A.M. 


Sept. 10 


3.30 p.m. 


April 6 


I 1.59 


8.00 p.m. to 


Sept. 17 


.30 


9.30 a.m. to 5.45 a.m. 


April 8 




3.15 A.M. 


Sept. 22 


\ .59 


11.45 p.m. to 


April 9 


.07 


8.15 p.m. to 3.30 a.m. 


Sept. 23 


10.30 A.M. 


April 13 


.04 


4.00 a.m. to 6.30 A.M. 


Sept. 30 


.65 


3.30 P.M. to 11.15 p.m. 


April 18 


1.08 


2.15 p.m. to 7.30 a.m. 








April 20 


.25 


9.30 a.m. to 11.15 p.m. 




8.77 




April 21 


\ .26 


3.00 a.m. to 








April 22 


.03 


5.30 p.m. 
12.15 p.m. to 1.30 a.m. 








April 25 








April 30 


.39 


7.45 p.m. to 7.00 a.m. 


Oct. 7 


.12 


6.00 p.m. to 6.45 a.m. 




5.26 






Nov. 11 


.02 










7.40 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


May 1 


.12 


7.00 a.m. to 10.00 A.M. 


Nov. 13 


.03 


2.15 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 


May 4 


.06 


7.15 a.m. to 7.45 a.m. 


Nov. 21 


.03 


5.15 a.m. to 5.50 a.m. 


May 5 


\ .04 


5.45 a.m. to 


Nov. 22 


\ .96 


7.30 p.m. to 


May 6 




9.45 a.m. 


Nov. 23 


5.30 p.m. 


May 8 


| 2.06 


4.25 p.m. to 


Nov. 24 


.13 


8.30 a.m. to 12.00 m 


May 13 




9.00 A.M. 


Nov. 29 


.55 2 


9.45 a.m. to 1.45 a.m. 


May 14 


.08 


4.20 a.m. to 5.45 a.m. 












May 19 


\ .03 


3.00 a.m. to 




1.72 




May 22 




9.00 A.M. 








May 24 


1 .56 


6.40 p.m. to 

8.30 a.m. 








May 25 








May 27 


.03 


8.10 p.m. to 3.30 a.m. 


Dec. 5 


.40 


7.45 p.m. to 4.45 a.m. 


May 28 


.03 


5.30 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 


Dec. 8 


.29 


1.45 p.m. to 2.00 a.m. 








Dec. 12 


\ .17 2 
.13 


12.30 a.m. to 




3.01 




Dec. 13 
Dec. 17 


10.00 p.m. 








7.30 a.m. to 12.15 p.m. 








Dec. 18 


1 - 21 


8.15 p.m. to 


June 3 


\ .27 


3.15 a.m. to 


Dec. 19 




5.30 p.m. 


June 4 


2.30 a.m. 


Dec. 23 


1 .431 


6.30 a.m. to 


June 6 


.03 


4.30 p.m. to 6.30 a.m. 


Dec. 24 


J 


4.35 p.m. 


June 8 


.03 


4.30 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 












June 14 


.20 


7.00 a.m. to 3.30 A.M. 




1.63 




June 21 


.35 
.37 


7.00 A.M. to 10.00 A.M. 

8.30 a. M. to 9.00 p.m. 








June 25 








June 27 


.02 


2.30 p.m. to 2.50 p.m. 










1.27 





1 Snow. 



Total for year 38.81 inches. 

2 Rain and Snow. 



P. D. 48 



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74 P. D. 48 

Table No. 6. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct 



Month 



January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 



Number of 
Days during 

which 

Water was 

Flowing 



26 
24 
20 
20 
26 
25 
26 
26 
25 
26 
24 
26 



294 



Actual Time 



Hours 



264 
241 
207 
274 
288 
253 
291 
364 
319 
276 
236 
276 



Minutes 




45 


45 
15 
10 
18 

3 
15 
45 
30 
45 



137.23 days 



Million 
Gallons 
Drawn 



2,127.1 
3,184.8 
2,258.2 
2,914.8 
2,837.6 
3,475.8 
4,265.7 
3,802.5 
3,270.2 
4,004.7 
2,867.5 
4,097.1 



39,106.0 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir 




Number of 
Days during 


Actual Time 


Million 


Month 


which 
Water was 




Gallons 








Drawn 




Flowing 


Hours 


Minutes 






26 


439 


14 


1,867.3 




24 


413 


15 


1,892.8 




26 


436 


35 


1,994.4 




26 


488 


00 


1,882.4 




26 


442 


00 


1,937.6 




25 


428 


26 


1,832.8 




26 


442 


20 


1,922.6 




26 


423 


20 


1,894.5 




26 


436 


40 


1,912.6 




27 


444 


20 


1,952.6 




25 


412 


41 


1,827.1 




26 ' 


451 


29 


2,026.5 


Totals 


309 


219.10 days 


22,943.2 



From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir 





Number of 








Days during 




Million 


Month 


which 


Actual Time 


Gallons 




Water was 


(Hours) 


Drawn 




Flowing 








31 


744 


2,016.9 




29 


696 


1,765.8 




31 


744 


1,589.9 




30 


719 


1,488.7 




31 


729 


1,497.5 




30 


720 


1,730.0 




31 


744 


2,041.5 




31 


744 


1,824.8 




30 


717 


1,654.2 




31 


744 


1,873.5 




30 


685 


1,784.5 




31 


744 


1,949.4 


Totals 


366 


8,730 


21,216.7 



P. D. 48 
Table No. 7. 



75 

Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
192b, by Months 1 





Wachusett 


Weston 


Sudbury 


Cochituate 




Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 


Aqueduct 




into 


into 


into 


into 


Month 


Sudbury 


Metropolitan 


Chestnut Hill 


Chestnut Hill 




Reservoir 


District 


Reservoir 


Reservoir 




(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


(Gallons) 


January . . „ . 


68,429,000 


60,236,000 


65,061,000 




February 


s 












109,638,000 


65,269,000 


60,890,000 


— 


March 














72,661,000 


64,335,000 


51,287,000 


— 


April 














97,095,000 


62,834,000 


49,692,000 


— 


May 














91,348,000 


62,503,000 


48,306,000 


- 


June 














115,660,000 


61,093,000 


57,667,000 


— 


July . 














137,387,000 


62,019,000 


65,855,000 


— 


August 














122,442,000 


61,113,000 


58,864,000 


- 


September 














108,656,000 


63,665,000 


55,063,000 


— 


October . 














129,000,000 


62,987,000 


60,435,000 


- 


November 














95,387,000 


60,903,000 


59,483,000 


— 


December 














131,971,000 


65,371,000 


62,884,000 


- 


Average 














106,651,000 


62,686,000 


57,969,000 


- 



Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



P. D. 48 



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P. D. 48 83 

Table No. 15. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 

1898-192^. [Parts per 100,000] 











Color 


Residue on 
Evaporation 


Ammonia 


03 

d 

o 


S 

3 

73 

a 
o 
O 

a 

M 

X 

O 






T3 

u 

a 

CI 73 

3 03 
.5 02 

5 


o 
H 


a 
o 
'-3 

O M 
Ot— I 

m 
ai 
O 
Hi 


0J 


ALBUMINOID 




Year 


"3 
o 


73 

"o 

m 

on 

s 


T3 
0J 

-0 

a 

V 

a 

n 
3 
02 


m. 
73 

CD 

a 
-o 
f~ 

03 

K 


1898 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899 








.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122. 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900 








.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901 








.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902 








.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903 








.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904 








.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905 








.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906 








.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907 








.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908 








.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909 








.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910 








.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911 








.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912 








.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913 








.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914 








.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915 








.16 


3.73 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916 








.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


— 


1.4 


1917 








.15 


4.45 


1.68 


.0015 


.0142 


.0124 


.0018 


.33 


- 


1.3 


1918 








.18 


3.89 


1.45 


.0019 


.0154 


.0128 


.0026 


.29 


— 


1.4 


1919 








.20 


4.28 


1.41 


.0010 


.0130 


.0108 


.0022 


.36 


- 


1.5 


1920 








.17 


4.23 


1.35 


.0012 


.0112 


.0097 


.0014 


.33 


— 


1.5 


1921 








.13 


3.80 


1.39 


.0006 


.0104 


.0089 


.0015 


.25 


- 


1.4 


1922 








.16 


3.98 


1.55 


.0011 


.0097 


.0080 


.0017 


.30 


— 


1.8 


1923 








.15 


3.90 


1.45 


.0011 


.0100 


.0090 


.0010 


.26 


- 


1.5 


1924 








.12 


4.10 


1.60 


.0011 


.0109 


.0084 


.0025 


.28 


~ 


1.5 



Table No. 16. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various 
Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1898-192k- [Averages of weekly 
determinations] 











Chestnut Hill Reservoir 


Southern Service Taps 


Year 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 

Chamber 




Effluent 


Low Service, 


High Service, 




Cochituate 

Aqueduct 


Gate-house 
No. 2. 


180 Boylston 
Street 


1 Ashburton 
Place 


1898 .... 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 




1899 . 








224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900 . 








248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901 . 








225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902 . 








203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903 . 








76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904 . 








347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905 . 








495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906 . 








231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907 . 








147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908 . 








162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909 . 








198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910 . 








216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911 . 








205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912 . 








429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913 . 








123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914 . 








288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915 . 








163 


- 


128 


117 


134 


1916 . 








128 


- 


85 


102 


105 


1917 . 








178 


112 


119 


119 


141 


1918 . 








1,163 


168 


705 


317 


544 


1919 . 








92 


85 


100 


70 


84 


1920 . 








148 


86 


108 


113 


112 


1921 . 








103 


— 


83 


92 


92 


1922 . 








163 


- 


153 


160 


172 


1923 . 








229 


- 


178 


217 


230 


1924 . 








137 


— 


96 


150 


160 



84 



P. D. 48 



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Belmont 
Boston . 
Chelsea 
Everett 
Lexington 
Maiden 
Medford 
Melrose 
Milton . 
Nahant 
Quincy . 
Revere . 
Somerville 
Stoneham 
Swampscott 
Watertown . 
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87 



88 P. D. 48 

Table No. 22. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters, Per Cent of Services Metered, Fire 
Services and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and Towns Supplied by the Metro- 
politan Water Works, Dec. 31, 1924. 



City or Town 



Arlington 
Belmont 
Boston . 
Chelsea . 
Everett . 
Lexington 
Maiden . 
Medford 
Melrose . 
Milton . 
Nahant . 
Quincy . 
Revere . 
Somerville 
Stoneham 
Swampscott 
Watertown 
Winthrop 

Totals 



Services 



304 
875 
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478 
422 
715 
440 
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,784 
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954 
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,389 
,189 
,942 
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180,039 



Meters 



4,304 
2,875 

85,103 
5,463 
5,740 
1,715 
8,395 
7,891 
4,784 
2,830 
896 

11,755 
4,714 

13,279 
1,942 
2,217 
4,081 
3,197 



171,181 



Per Cent 

of Services 

M etered 



100.00 

100.00 

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99.73 

89.38 

100.00 

99.47 

100 . 00 

100.00 

100.00 

93.92 

91.12 

87.47 

93.59 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 



95.08 



Services 
Used for 

Fire 
Purposes 

Only 



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4 

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101 

37 
7 

66 

20 

22 
1 
2 

23 
6 

60 



28 
6 



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Fire 
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598 
359 
10,529 
415 
676 
267 
646 
789 
409 
501 
106 

1,402 
359 

1,279 
158 
237 
477 
339 



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P. D. 48 



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P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 3. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1 
Number 


2 


3 

Number 


Amount of Bid 


6 




4 


5 






of 


WORK 


of 


Next to 




Contractor 




Contract 




Bids 


Lowest 


Lowest 




1 


142 


Section 71, New Mystic 
Sewer, North Metro- 
politan System , in 
Winchester. 


5 


$98,420 00 


$80,950 00i 


V. J. Grande, Boston 


2 


162 


Section 72, New Mystic 
Sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System, in Win- 
chester and Woburn. 


12 


59,608 00 1 


51,143 80 


Antony Cefalo, West 
• Roxbury. 


3 


18 


Section 77, Mill Brook 
Valley Sewer, North 
Metropolitan System, 
in Medford. 


7 


$120,825 00 1 


$117,256 25 


Anthony Baruffaldi 
Co., Somerville. 



Contracts relating to the 



1 


132 


Uniflow engine and cen- 
trifugal pump for Ward 
Street Pumping Sta- 
tion in Roxbury. 


4 


$26,396 00 1 


$23,320 00 


Starkweather & 
Broadhurst, Boa- 
ton. 


2 


172 


Economizer for Ward 
Street Pumping Station 
in Roxbury. 


2 


2,468 00 


2,330 001 


B. F. Sturtevant 
Company, Boston 



i Contract based upon this bid. 



P. D. 48 



Appendix No. 3 



the Year 1924 — Sewerage Division 
North Metropolitan System 



93 



Date of Con- 
tract 



Aug. 2, 1923 



Jan. 17, 1924 



July 3, 1924 



8 

Date of 

Completion 

of work 



June 5, 1924 



Aug. 4, 1924 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1924 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 
30-inch by 31-inch concrete sewer, $11.00 per 
Hn. ft.; for earth excavation and refilling in 
trench and laying of pipe for 20-inch Akron 
pipe sewer, $9.00 per lin. ft. ; for Portland ce- 
ment brick masonry in manholes and special 
structures, $40 per cu. yd.; for Portland ce- 
ment concrete masonry in trench and special 
structures, $14.00 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement boulder concrete masonry, $3.00 per 
cu. yd.; for bank gravel refilling around pipe 
sewer, $5.00 per cu. yd. ; for rock excavation 
in trench, $12.00 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 
36-inch by 42-inch concrete sewer, $30,00 per 
lin. ft.; for earth excavation and refilling in 
trench and laying of pipe for 30-inch cast- 
iron pipe sewer, $15.00 per lin. ft.; for Port- 
land cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures, $35.00 per cu. yd.; for 
Portland cement concrete masonry in trench 
and special structures, $15.00 per cu. yd. ; for 
Portland cement boulder concrete masonry, 
$10.00 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation in 
trench, $10.00 per cu yd. 



10 

Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31, 
1924 



$82,919 82 



61,783 38 



48,435 82 



South Metropolitan System 



June 1, 1923 Sept. 11, 1924 



March 1, 1924 



April 18, 1924 



For furnishing and erecting fuel economizer 
complete with scrapers and scraper driving 
mechanism, consisting of twenty sections, 
six wide with 9 ft. pipes, and standard sec- 
tional covers. 



$26,396 00 



$2,330 00 



2 Contract completed. 



94 P.D. 48 

Contracts made and pending during the Year 1924 — Sewerage Division 

— Concluded 



Summary of Contracts 






Value of 
Work done Dec. 
31, 1924 




$193,139 02 

28,726 00 


Total of 5 contracts made and pending during the year 1924 . . 


$221,865 02 



Appendix No. 4. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT ON 

JANUARY 15, 1925 

The Metropolitan District Commissioner respectfully presents the following 
abstract of the account of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Metropolitan District Commission for the year ending November 
30, 1924, together with recommendations for legislation which it deems desirable, 
in accordance with the provisions of Section 100 of Chapter 92 of the General 
Laws. 

Metropolitan Water Works 

Construction 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan Water Acts, the 
receipts which are added to the loan fund, the expenditures for the construction 
and acquisition of works, and the balance available on December 1, 1924, have 
been as follows : — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water Acts, including appropriations under St. 1920, 
c. 530, to provide for the reinforcement of the low-service and the northern high-service 
pipe lines, the construction of a reservoir in Arlington for the northern extra high ser- 
vice, to provide additional pumping machinery for the northern high service at Spot 
Pond and the southern high service at Chestnut Hill pumping stations . . . $45,685,000 00 

Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan Water District, paid 

into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320) . . . . 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the credit of the Metropolitan 
Water Loan Fund: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 $2,703 45 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 285,136 48 

287,839 93 



$46,062,839 93 
Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 $786,031 57 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 44,093,010 49 

44,879,042 06 

Balance December 1, 1924 $1,183,797 87 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds issued at the end of the 
fiscal year was $44,547,000, bonds to the amount of $1,000,000 having been issued 
during the year. Of the total amount issued, $41,398,000 were sinking fund 
bonds, and the remainder, amounting to $3,149,000, was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $44,125,000, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $422,000 had been 
paid. During the fiscal year $56,000 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1924. 
to $21,396,342.90, an increase during the year of $1,117,961.04. 



P. D. 48 95 

Maintenance 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and operation of works, for the 

year ending November 30, 1924 $776,320 00 

Unexpended balance December 1, 1923, of amount appropriated for in- 
vestigation, etc., of certain sources of water supply for the Metropoli- 
tan District 21,814 58 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending November 30, 1924 . 7,681 92 

$805,816 50 

Amount approved for the maintenance and operation of works during 

the year ending November 30, 1924 $753,134 49 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the year 1923 . . . 37,652 02 

715,482 47 

Balance December 1, 1924 $90,334 03 

Included in the foregoing balance is $11,849.16, remaining unexpended from 
the amount appropriated for investigation and experimentation for filtration of 
certain sources of water supply from the Metropolitan District, under Item 673, 
Chapter 126, Acts of 1923. 

The Commission has also received during the year ending November 30, 1924, 
$97,435.32 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and power and from other 
proceeds from the operation of the Metropolitan Water Works, which, according 
to Section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are applied by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth to the payment of interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to 
sinking fund requirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of works, 
in reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metropolitan Water District 
for the year. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging to the District 
and to water companies, and from municipalities for admission to the District, 
have been as follows : — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities and towns of the Dis- 
trict, as provided by Section 3 of the Metropolitan Water Act ... . . $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 1, 1923, applied to the 

Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by Chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907 136,267 14 

For the year beginning December 1, 1923, and ending November 30, 1924, applied to the 

Metropolitan W T ater Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by said last-named act. . . 12,971 21 

$369,104 00 

It appears from the foregoing financial statement that on December 1, 1924, 
the balance remaining unexpended on account of the amount of the Metropolitan 
Water Loan Fund, authorized for the construction and acquisition of works, was 
$1,183,797.87. This balance consists principally of the amounts remaining for 
the improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, the construction of a supply main from 
the terminal chamber of the Weston Aqueduct to a point near the old Mystic 
Pumping Station and additional pumping machinery for Spot Pond Pumping 
Station. 

Metropolitan Sewerage Works 

Construction 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for the con- 
struction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to 
the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures for construction, are given below, 
as follows : — 

Nokth Metropolitan System 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construction under the various 
acts, including those for the Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions, 
North System enlargement and extensions, New Mystic Sewer, Deer 
Island outfall extension, lowering sewer siphon under Maiden River, 
balance of appropriation under Chapter 76, Resolves of 1915, for the 
Reading extension, for the new Mystic sewer in Woburn and Win- 
chester under Chapter 529, Acts of 1922 and for the construction of the 
Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Medford and Arlington, appropriated by 
Chapter 116, Acts of 1924 $8,312,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources, which 
are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 52 66 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 87,513 38 

$8,399,931 77 

Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 

Fund, North System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 $179,590 61 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 7,606,432 42 

7,786,023 03 

Balance December 1, 1924 $613,908 74 



96 P. D. 48 

South Metropolitan System 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construction under the various 
acts, applied to the construction of the Charles River Valley Sewer, 
Neponset valley sewer, High-level sewer and extensions (including 
Wellesley branch) and an additional appropriation authorized by 
Chapter 525, Acts of 1920, for additional Ward Street station pumping 
plant, a new force main from the Quincy Station, a new pump and 
other equipment at the Quincy Station and an additional appropria- 
tion for the Wellesley extension, authorized under Chapter 529, Acts of 

1922 $9,992,046 27 

Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 
which are placed to the credit of the South Metropolitan System: -— 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 - 

For the period ending December 1, 1923 24,599 61 

$10,016,645 88 

Amount approved for payment from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 

Fund, South System: — 

On account of the Charles River Valley Sewer $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset Valley Sewer 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and extensions: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 35,994 18 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 . . . ■ . . 8,256,887 07 

10,004,458 98 

Balance December 1, 1924 $12,186 90 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Bonds issued at the end of the 
fiscal year was $17,641,412, no bonds having been issued during the year. Of 
the total amount issued, $15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds and the remainder, 
amounting to $2,200,500, was serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was $17,164,912, 
as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $61,500 had been 
paid during the year, $476,500 having been paid to December 1, 1924. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,373,000 were issued 
for the North Metropolitan System, and $9,791,912 for the South Metropolitan 
System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 
1, 1924, to $7,353,533.77, of which $4,483,533.09 was on account of the North 
Metropolitan System, and $2,870,000.68 was on account of the South Metro- 
politan System, an increase during the year of $601,350.14. 

The net debt on December 1, 1924, was $9,811,378.23, a decrease of $662,850.14. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System is $1,075,500 
in serial bonds, of which $265,500 has been paid, and $1,125,000 for the South 
Metropolitan System, of which $211,000 has been paid. 

Maintenance 

Nokth Metropolitan System 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1924 . $335,200 00 

Receipts from pumping and other sources, which are returned to the appropriation: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 1,347 37 

$336,547 37 
Amount approved for maintenance and operation of Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Works, North System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 $329,540 37 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the year 1923 . . . 23,926 63 

305,613 74 

Balance December 1, 1924 $30,933 63 

Balance of appropriation under Item 670£, Chapter 494, Acts 1923, reappropriated by 
Resolve 17, Acts 1924, to cover expenses relative to additional sewers in the town of 
Arlington and the city of Medford $26,893 18 

Amount approved for payment to November 30, 1924 8,554 99 

Balance December 1, 1924 $18,338 19 

South Metropolitan System 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1924 $224,420 00 

Receipts from sales of property, reimbursement and for pumping, which are returned to 
the appropriation: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 . 848 66 

$225,268 66 
Amount approved for maintenance and operation of Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, South System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 $204,782 60 

Deduct amount paid from appropriation for the year 1923 . . . 7,527 50 

■ I'm ,*oo 1U 

Balance December 1, 1924 $28,013 56 



P. D. 48 97 

The balance of $613,908.74 on account of construction in the North Metro- 
politan System consists almost entirely of the amount appropriated and remaining 
unexpended for constructing the Mill Brook Valley Sewer in Medford and Arling- 
ton, under Chapter 116, Acts of 1924 and the unexpended balance remaining for 
the completion of the New Mystic sewer and the Reading extension. 

The balance of $12,186.90 remaining unexpended on account of construction 
in the South Metropolitan Sewerage System consists of the amount remaining 
for the completion of the additions to the pumping plant at Ward Street Pumping 
Station, and also amounts appropriated under Chapter 529 of the Acts of 1922 
for the completion of the Wellesley extension of the High-level sewer, for the 
construction of a new force main from the Quincy Pumping Station and also for 
a new pump and other equipment at the Quincy Pumping Station. 

Metropolitan Parks Division 
Construction 
The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for the con- 
struction of Metropolitan Parks and Boulevards, Charles River bridges, Charles 
River Basin, North Beacon Street Bridge, Nantasket Beach, the receipts which y 
have been added to the loan funds, the expenditures for the acquisition of property 
and construction of works, and the balances available on December 1, 1924, have 
been as follows : — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund $9,093,043 96 

Receipts added to loan before June 1, 1901 198,942 81 

$9,291,986 77 
Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 - 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 $9,262,649 13 

9,262,649 13 

Balance December 1, 1923 $29,337 64 

The amount of the Metropolitan Parks Loan Bonds issued at the end of the 
fiscal year was $9,809,000, no bonds having been issued during the year. Of the 
total amount issued, $9,485,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, y 
amounting to $324,000, was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $9,608,000, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $201,000 had been 
paid. During the fiscal year $19,250 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Parks Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1924, 
to $5,141,257.94, an increase during the year of $255,916.95. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II $9,354,000 00 

Receipts from sales, etc. 29,934 16 

$9,383,934 16 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 $632,489 84 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 7,158,159 29 

7,790,649 13 

Balance December 1, 1924 $1,593,285 03 

The amount of the Metropolitan Parks Loan, Series II Bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $4,036,437.50, no bonds having been issued during the 
year. Of the total amount issued, $2,567,500 were sinking fund bonds, and the 
remainder, amounting to $1,468,937.50, was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of outstanding bonds was $3,621,243.75, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $415,193.75 had been 
paid. During the fiscal year $71,493.75 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Parks Loan, Series II, Sinking Fund amounted on December 
1, 1924, to $1,306,035.89, an increase during the year of $64,586.77. 



98 ' P. D. 48 

Charles River Basin Loan 

Charles River Basin Loan . . ... . . . $4,500,000 00 

Receipts added to loan 9,368 91 

$4,509,368 91 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 . $60 00 

For the period prior to December 1, 1925 . 4,472,802 22 

4,472,862 22 

Balance December 1, 1924 $36,506 69 

The amount of the Charles River Basin Loan Bonds issued at the end of the 
fiscal year was $4,500,000, no bonds having been issued during the year. Of the 
total amount issued, $4,125,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, 
amounting to $375,000, was issued as serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the. amount of outstanding bonds was $4,378,000, as 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $122,000 had been paid. 
During the fiscal year $10,000 in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Charles River Basin Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1924, 
to $1,557,130.31, an increase during the year of $95,025.05. 

« 

Charles River Bridges Loan 
Charles River Bridges Loan $1,825,000 00 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 • $247,189 21 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 . . . ... . . 80,316 39 

■ 327,505 60 

Balance December 1, 1924 ... . $1,497,49440 

North Beacon Street Bridge Loan 
North Beacon Street Bridge Loan $175,000 00 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 - 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 $174,853 50 

174,853 50 

Balance December 1, 1924 $146 50 

Nantasket Beach Loan 
Nantasket Beach Loan $705,881 50 

Expenditures 
For the period prior to December 1, 1924 705,881 50 



Massachusetts Avenue Bridge Loan 
Chapter 442, Acts of 1924 . . . ■ . . . . $600,000 00 

Expenditures 
For the year ending November 30, 1924 354,702 36 

Balance December 1, 1924 . $245,297 64 

Northern Traffic Route Loan 
Chapter 489, Acts of 1924 $2,400,000 00 

Expenditures 
For the year ending November 30, 1924 • . . . 5,023 56 

Balance December 1, 1924 $2,394,976 44 

Metropolitan Parks Trusx Fund 

Receipts for year ending November 30, 1924 ...... $100 68 

Receipts for the period prior to December 1, 1923 . . ' • . . . 40,572 53 

$40,673 21 

Expenditures 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 - 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 $38,106 50 

38,106 50 

Balance December 1, 1924 $2,566 71 



P. D. 48 



99 



Maintenance 
Metropolitan Parks 



Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund: 

General 

Special: 

Bank Concerts .... 

Investigation Harvard Bridge . 

Expended to Dec. 1, 1923 



$25,000 00 
552 57 



Clearing woods . 
Expended to.Dec. 1, 1923 



$100,000 00 
55,594 06 



Alewife Brook Grading 

Westerly Border Road, West Roxbury Parkway 
Revere Beach Reservation: 

Eliot Circle to Revere Street .... 

Electric Lighting System 

Investigation Lynn Woods to Newburyport Turnpike 

Nahant Beach Playground 

Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund, Boulevards: — 

General . . . • 

Special: 

Blue Hill River Road .... $75,000 00 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1923 ... 



Temporary repairs to Cottage Farm Bridge $15,000 00 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1923 . . . 6,107 47 



Winthrop Parkway .... 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1923 

Parkway, Stoneham and Wakefield 
Sidewalks, Charles River Road 
Roadway, Neponset River Parkway 
Sidewalks, Blue Hills Parkway 
Charles River Basin maintenance: 

General 

Special: 

Repairs to locks and gates 
Expended to Dec. 1, 1923 



Nantasket Beach maintenance 
Wellington Bridge maintenance 
Bunker Hill maintenance . 



$225,000 00 
219,754 85 



$17,500 00 
15,714 72 



Appropria- 
tion, 1924 



$770,394 00 
20,000 00 

24,447 43 



44,405 94 
'2,500 00 
40,000 00 

90,000 00 

50,000 00 

500 00 

5,000 00 

465,000 00 



75,000 00 
8,892 53 



5,245 15 
5,000 00 
2,500 00 
10,000 00 
6,000 00 

189,450 00 



1,785 28 
78,000 00 
15,700 00 
10,000 00 



Expended 
1924 



$705,901 67 
19,152 66 

3,038 08 



694 72 

2,481 89 

28,129 59 

26,633 05 

500 00 

2,651 28 

384,774 02 



1,769 20 



2,208 22 
8,499 37 
1,006 88 

183,781 44 



1,785 28 
75,489 58 
15,150 27 

9,732 93 



Balance 

December, 

1, 1924 



$64,492 33 
847 34 

21,409 35 

43,711 22 

18 11 

11,870 41 

63,366 95 
50,000 00 

2,348 72 

80,225 98 

75,000 00 
7,123 33 



5,245 15 

5,000 00 

291 78 

1,500 63 

4,993 12 

5,668 56 



2,510 42 
549 73 
267 07 



Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund 
Receipts: 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 

Expenditures: 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 

For the period prior to December 1, 1923 ; 



Balance December 1, 1924 



General Revenue 
Bunker Hill Monument: — 
Receipts: 

For the year ending November 30, 1924 
For the period prior to December 1, 1923 . 



$230,399 37 
2,405,953 16 



$125,204 56 
2,203,308 15 



$4,518 20 
7,579 60 



$2,636,352 53 



2,328,512 71 
$307,839 82 



$12,097 80 



OCT 8 1926